Taste Graph: A narrative visualization tool for massive media data

Traditional newspapers are moving dramatically to digital publishing and data analytics in order to better understand their users’ behaviors, build their subscriber base, maintain their online readers, determine advertising placements. The goal is to deepen and diversify their revenue streams. For this purpose, VAL's Taste Graph research analyzes and synthesis the Globe and Mail data about their subscribers and their web-browsing habits, indicating connections between tastes.

Discovering affinities across different categories is a promising method of segmenting the audience within the context of media planning and potential advertising campaigns. For example, if someone shops for organic vegetables they might be more likely to shop to organic tea. Also, if data indicates close affinities between the categories of organic clothes and organic foods, it is reasonable that a purchaser of both organic vegetable and tea packs will be interested in shopping for an organic cotton shirt if they are provided with a choice to pick a shirt. As well, the people within the taste category  ‘organic’ could also be interested in certain types of drinks, types of shoes, and a sports travel lifestyle.

To establish similar taste correlations within Globe and Mail data, we follow a “narrative approach” that helps tell stories with the data by providing a smooth transition from raw data to communicating through data visualization. The tool we are developing supports the Globe and Mail marketing teams. Firstly, it provides an easy way to filter multiple sources of data and find relationships. Secondly, it shows patterns regarding Globe and Mail audience tastes in customized narrative visualizations. From these, the marketing teams could gain holistic knowledge about their audience tastes and see the impact of certain taste correlations or become aware of some hidden insights of interest regarding relationships between tastes. Thirdly, it allows Globe and Mail people to remain continuously knowledgeable about their business performance measures.

Our organization of the design space involves two types of narrative tactics: visual and structural. For visual tactics, we deploy several visual mechanisms that assist and facilitate the narrative. We chose a bubble chart, and grouped bar chart to illustrate, evaluate, and compare tastes, scores and engagement levels. Colour is then applied to different categories of advertisements to indicate degrees of divergence in tastes. We depend on navigation strategies as a structural tactic to assist the narrative. For example, we arrange the paths the viewer might take through the visualizations, and we make the visualizations interactive by including filtering, selecting, searching, and navigating of advertisement data. These strategies are tested and refined with Globe and Mail design and marketing teams and will then be audience tested.

Our visualization tool, in general, respects secure web application standards. Our goal is to provide the Globe and Mail with intuitive reports about the overall and manifold correlations of tastes of their readership and advertising audiences. Our proposed tool handles the complexity of massive and heterogeneous marketing data records and translates it into a communicative interface.

See a preview of TasteGraph from the IEEE Computer Society Visualization and Graphics Technical Committee VIS2018 here.

Click here to see Ahmad Karawash presenting this research at the Ontario OAR Conference, May 16 2018.
Click here to view this project on SOSCIP's page.

This research was presented by Dr. Ahmad Karawash, Postdoctoral Fellow and Team Lead, and Sana Shepko at the Ontario Centres of Excellence annual Discovery conference on May 1st, 2018 (see below).
 

Image of interactive tool, showing a graphical comparison of universe vs. specific category's engagement with taste groups
Photograph of Ahmad Karawash and Sana Shepko attending Discovery 2018 conference to present research.
Friday, May 18, 2018 - 10:45am
Lab Member: 
Ahmad Karawash
Marcus A. Gordon
Jad Rabbaa
Sana Shepko
Afrooz Samaei
Lan-Xi Dong
Dr. Greice C. Mariano
Hugh Ritchie
Ana Jofre
Stephen Keller
Dr. Steve Szigeti
Dr. Sara Diamond

Connection, communication and temporality in conversations on death and dying

INVESTIGATING CONNECTION, COMMUNICATION AND TEMPORALITY IN CONVERSATIONS ON DEATH AND DYING USING A DESIGN RESEARCH APPROACH

The objective of this project is to develop improved understanding of communication at end of life in order to enhance public dialogue on end-of-life issues and provide insights on use of communication technology in end-of-life service provision. Specifically, this project aims to:

  1. Develop and adapt art and design techniques for engaging in research on the topic of death and dying
  2. To understand how communication technologies are used during decline and death, especially for families at a distance
  3. To develop an example artifact, based on the outcomes of the research, to be used in stimulating dialogue on new ways of understanding connection and the temporal aspects of death and dying

This project explores themes of technology use, connection, communication, and temporality in the dying process. As seniors make up Canada's fastest growing age group, Canadians will increasingly need to confront the experience of "end of life". While death and dying includes conversations on the concerns of healthcare providers about medical care, a more comprehensive conversation about end-of-life encompasses discussions on a broader range of topics, including family dynamics, interpersonal relationships, life experiences, spiritual values and personal beliefs and preferences.

While technology can be a connector for family at a distance, its role when the pace of decline changes is not well understood. This is an especially relevant concern in a time that increasingly sees adult children living at a distance from their parents. When family members are not physically present their understanding of a relative's decline in health is reduced, impacting their ability to respond appropriately, plan, and equally distribute tasks related to the care of their dying loved one. 

This project brings together families, support groups, caregivers, and healthcare providers to better understand the use of communication technology in connecting families at end-of-life. Clients, family/friends, and providers at the Toronto Central Service Delivery Centre of Saint Elizabeth Health Care were invited to participate in interviews and co-design workshops to identify key concepts and themes regarding communication around decline and death. Data from this research will be integral to creating a "Death, Dying and Design" toolkit, intended for design practitioners to use as guidance when engaging in design research on the difficult topic of end-of-life.

Research creation artifacts generated through this project will enrich public discourse and open up dialogue on end-of-life choices. Facilitating dialogue on these choices, such as the decision to die at home, in hospice, or to forego intensification of care, has the potential to significantly impact policy on the provision of hospice or end-of-life care in the home.

For more information, please visit http://deathdyinganddesign.com and The Reflection Room.

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

 

SSHRC Logo

 

Creator: 
Photograph of a student writing on a whiteboard. Text on the wall describes potential patient reactions to a negative diagnosis
Friday, April 13, 2018 - 10:00am
Lab Member: 
Kate Sellen

Emerge Media Awards 2015

Poster with big block letter in orange, pink and purple
Monday, April 20, 2015 - 9:45pm to Tuesday, April 21, 2015 - 3:00am

The Emerge Media Awards celebrates and showcases the achievements of journalism, media studies and communications students across Canada. Our first awards gala is Monday, April 20, 2015 at the Humber Room, Humber College, Toronto. 
In addition to a keynote speech by Sean Beckingham, Founder of Branding and Buzzing, guests will have a chance to mingle with leading media-industry professionals and, of course, cheer as six participants claim their prizes. 
Learn more about Sean Beckingham and his social marketing agency visit at http://brandingandbuzzing.com/ 

Nominee:

Robynn Jennings - OCAD University 

Entry Category: Digital Design

Entry Name: "PETA Ad."

 

Facebook: Emerge.TO

Twitter: @EmergeTO

Instagram: emergeto

#EmergeMediaAwards and #MakeMediaThatMatters

Venue & Address: 
The Humber Room, Humber College - 205 Humber College Blvd. Toronto, Ontario. M9W 5L7 
Website: 
http://www.emergemediaawards.ca
Cost: 
Tickets are on sale for $25.00 CAD via Eventbrite.ca    Dress Code: Business Casual