ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 - 6:00pm to Saturday, December 7, 2019 - 5:00pm

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ
Among All These Tundras

September 18 to December 7, 2019

Free public reception
With performance by Allison Akootchook Warden
Wednesday, September 18 from 6 to 9 p.m.

ᐊᓯᓐᓇᔭᖅ
asinnajaq
ᓛᑯᓗᒃ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻᓴᓐ ᐸᑦᑑᕆ
Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
ᑲᕈᓚ ᑯᕋᕼᐊᓐ
Carola Grahn
ᒫᔾᔭ ᕼᐋᓕᓐᑐ ᐅᓇᓗ ᓵᒥ ᕕᓐᓚᓐᒥᐅᑕᖅ
Marja Helander
ᖃᑉᓗᓯᐊᖅ
Kablusiak
ᓵᓐᔭ ᑲᓕᕼᐅ-ᑰᒻᔅ
Sonya Kelliher-Combs
ᔪᐊᖅ ᓇᓐᑰ
Joar Nango
ᑕᕐᕋᓕᒃ ᐹᑐᔨ
Taqralik Partridge
ᐱᐅᓕ ᐸᑐ
Barry Pottle
ᐃᓅᑎᖅ ᓯᑐᐊᑦᔅ
Inuuteq Storch
ᑲᔨᓐ ᐸᓐ ᕼᐅᕕᓕᓐ
Couzyn van Heuvelen
ᐊᓕᓴᓐ ᐊᑰᑦᓲᒃ ᒍᐊᑕᓐ
Allison Akootchook Warden

ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᑲᒪᔨᑦ: Hᐃᑐ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᐅᖅᑎ, ᐋᐃᒥ ᑎᒃᓯᓐ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᕆᓴ ᐹᓐ ᕼᐃᐅᓕᒐ
Curated by Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

ᓴᕿᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᑖᒃᑯᓇᖓᑦ ᓕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐲᓇ ᐊᓕᓐ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᒃ, ᑳᓐᑯᑎᐊ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃᔪᐊᖅ
Produced and circulated by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ, ᐊᑎᖓ ᐱᔭᐅᓯᒪᔪᖅ ᑕᐃᒎᓯᕐᒥᑦ “ᐊᖕᖏᕋᕋ ᐆᒻᒪᑎᓐᓃᑦᑐᖅ” ᑎᑎᕋᖅᓯᒪᔭᖓ ᓵᒥᒥᐅᑕᖅ ᓂᐅᔅ-ᐊᔅᓚᒃ ᕚᑭᐊᐹ, ᓴᕿᔮᖅᑎᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᓄᓇᖅᑲᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᑎᖏᓐᓂᑦ ᓇᑭᑐᐃᓐᓇᖅ ᑲᔾᔨᐊᓂ ᓄᓇᕐᔪᐊᑉ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᐊᓂ ᐅᑯᐊ ᓴᓇᔭᐅᔪᑦ ᐅᖃᐅᓯᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓂᕈᐊᖅᑕᐅᓯᒪᔪᓄᑦ ᐃᓄᖕᓄᑦ ᐅᖃᖅᓯᒪᔭᐅᔪᑦ ᒫᓐᓇ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᖅ ᐃᓱᒫᓘᑎᒋᓪᓗᒍ ᑐᑭᓯᓇᖅᓯᑎᑕᐅᕙᓪᓕᐊᑎᓪᓗᒋᑦ ᓄᓇ, ᐅᖃᐅᓯᖅ, ᓄᓇᖃᖅᑐᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐅᒃᐱᕐᓂᖅᑖᑲᓐᓂᕐᓂᖅ. ᓴᓇᖑᐊᖅᑎᑦ ᓄᓇᖅᑲᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᓄᓇᖏᓐᓂᑦ ᑕᒫᖓᑦ ᓄᓇᕐᔪᐊᑉ ᑲᔾᔨᐊᓂᑦ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᖅ ᑐᓴᕐᑎᑦᑎᔪᑦ ᐃᒻᒪᑲᓪᓚᓂᑦ ᖃᓪᓗᓈᖑᖅᑎᑕᐅᓯᒪᒐᒥᒃ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐊᑐᖅᓯᒪᔭᑎᒃ ᐳᐃᒍᓇᓐᖏᑦᑐᑦ ᐃᓅᓯᕆᓚᐅᖅᑕᒥᖕᓂᑦ, ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐊᑕᐅᓯᐅᓕᕐᓂᖅ ᓴᐳᒻᒥᓂᐊᕐᓗᒋᑦ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᖅ ᐆᒪᔪᓕᒫᖏᑦ ᐊᕙᑎᓕᒫᖏᓪᓗ, ᐅᖃᐅᓯᖏᑦ, ᐃᓄᖏᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᖏᑦ ᑕᒫᖓᑦ ᐱᐅᓐᖏᑦᑐᐋᓗᖕᓂᑦ ᐊᒃᑐᖅᑕᐅᓂᖓᓄᑦ ᓯᓚ ᐅᖂᓯᓂᖓᓄ ᐊᓯᑦᔨᕐᓂᖓᓄᑦ, ᓄᓇᕐᔪᐊᖅ ᓄᓇᒥᑦ ᐲᔭᐃᔪᒪᔪᑦ, ᐱᕈᖅᑎᑦᑎᕙᓪᓕᐊᔪᑦ ᑲᓐᐸᓂᕐᔪᐊᓂᒃ, ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓄᓇᖃᑎᒌᓐᖏᑦᑐᕐᔪᐊᑦ ᓵᓚᒌᖃᑦᑕᐅᑎᒐᓱᐊᖅᑐᑦ. ᑲᑐᔾᔨᓗᑕ, ᐅᑯᐊ ᓴᓇᔭᐅᔪᑦ ᑕᑯᑎᑦᑎᕗᒍᑦ ᐃᓚᒌᒍᓯᖏᓐᓂᒃ ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᐊᒃᑐᒐᒃᓴᐅᔪᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑭᓱᓕᒫᑦᓯᐊᖏᑦ ᓄᓇᖅᑲᖅᑳᖅᓯᒪᔪᑦ ᖃᐅᔨᒪᓂᖏᑦ ᐊᑐᖅᑕᐅᓗᑎᒃ, ᓄᑖᓂᒃ ᐱᓕᕆᔾᔪᑎᖃᕐᓕᕐᓂᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓄᖑᑉᐸᓪᓕᐊᓂᖏᑦᑐᓂᒃ, ᑎᔅᓯᓇᖅᑐᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐊᑐᕐᓗᒍ ᐊᓐᓇᒍᓐᓇᕐᓂᖅ, ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑕᒪᑦᑕ ᑲᑐᑎᓗᑎᒍᑦ ᐱᔭᒃᓴᕆᔭᕗᑦ ᐅᑭᐅᖅᑕᖅᑐᑉ ᐃᓅᓯᖓ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓄᓇᖓ.

Among All These Tundras, a title taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. Together, their works politically and poetically express current Arctic concerns towards land, language, sovereignty and resurgence. Artists from throughout the circumpolar north share kinship with each other and their ancestors, love for their homelands, and respect for the land and its inhabitants. Yet they also share histories of colonialism and experience its ongoing legacies and are united in their desire to protect northern ecologies, languages, peoples and knowledge from the nefarious effects of climate change, encroaching industry and competition. These resistance efforts do not merely express, they give shape to a collective ecology of care, a “decolonial love” (in the words of Leanne Simpson and others) that is both generous and generative. These works invite viewers to contemplate relationships between textual and embodied Indigenous knowledges, innovation and sustainability, humour and resilience, and our collective responsibility to northern life and land.

ᐃᓄᒃᑎᑑᓕᖅᑕᖏᑦ ᕉᑕ ᖃᔮᕐᔪᐊᖅ
Translation by Rhoda Kayakjuak


The exhibition publication is available online here.

Onsite Gallery, OCAD University is happy to offer a free interactive guide for families and young visitors to creatively engage with our current contemporary art exhibition. Click here to learn more.

 

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ Among All These Tundras

 

Free Public Events

  • Spoken Word Performance & Writing Activity with Taqralik Partridge
    Saturday, September 21 at 2:00p.m.
    Co-presented with Wapatah: Centre for Indigenous Visual Knowledge
    Join Inuk artist, writer, curator, throatsinger, spoken word poet and Onsite Gallery exhibiting artist, Taqralik Partridge, for a spoken word performance and writing activity. The title of Onsite Gallery’s exhibition, ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras, is taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää. During this event, Taqralik will perform one of her spoken word pieces and then guide attendees in a writing activity inspired by a shared theme.
     
  • Curators’ Tour with Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa
    Friday, September 27 at 6:30p.m.
    Join Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa for a curatorial tour of ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.
     
  • Exhibition Tour with Ryan Rice
    Thursday, October 17 at 6:30p.m.
    Join Ryan Rice for a tour of ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras. Ryan Rice, Kanien’kehá:ka, is an independent curator and the Associate Dean in the Faculty of Liberal Arts / School of Interdisciplinary Studies at OCAD University, Toronto.
     
  • imagineNATIVE Art Crawl
    Thursday, October 24 from 5:15 to 5:50 p.m.
    Co-presented with imagineNATIVE Media + Arts Festival
    This year's Art Crawl kicks off at Onsite Gallery, with a visit of ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras. The Art Crawl continues in the historic 401 Richmond building.
     
  • Peter Morin: Reciprocity with Among All These Tundras
    Thursday, November 14 at 6:30 p.m.
    Join Peter Morin for a performative reciprocal exchange with the artworks in ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.
     
  • The Fifth Region Film Screening and Conversation
    Wednesday, November 20 at 6:30 p.m.
    Nancy and Joshua are Inuit but raised in southern Canada. All their lives they struggled with aspects of their identities and now begin to redefine what is means to be a young urban Inuk growing up under the shadow of the Sixties Scoop and the residential school system. Join us for a screening of the documentary film, The Fifth Region, followed by a conversation with filmmaker Aeyliya Husain and lead participants Nancy Saunders and Joshua Stribbell.
     
  • Inuit Art On-Line
    Thursday, November 28 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
    Co-presented with Wapatah: Centre for Indigenous Visual Knowledge
    This public symposium will convene a panel of Inuit artists and scholars to discuss the role and importance of materiality in the creation and presentation of Inuit art. Visit Onsite Gallery’s webpage for a list of confirmed speakers.
     
  • Indigenous Collections Edit-a-Thon
    Friday, December 13 from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
    Co-presented with Wapatah: Centre for Indigenous Visual Knowledge
    Following a knowledge crowdsourcing model popularized by Wikipedia, this event will bring together communities of Indigenous cultural and collection specialists from across North America to begin shaping and populating content within the Virtual Platform for Indigenous Art.
     

 

Curator Biographies

Dr. Heather Igloliorte is the University Research Chair in Indigenous Circumpolar Arts at Concordia University in Tiohtiá:ke/Montreal, where she also leads the Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership SSHRC Partnership Grant and Co-Directs the Initiative for Indigenous Futures Cluster (IIF) in the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology with Professor Jason Edward Lewis. Igloliorte currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Indigenous Circle for the Winnipeg Art Gallery, working on the development of the new national Inuit Art Centre; on the Board of Directors for North America's largest Indigenous art historical association, the Native North American Art Studies Association; is Vice-President of the Inuit Art Foundation; and sits on the Faculty Council of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York, among others.

Amy Dickson is an emerging curator and doctoral student in the Art History program at Concordia University. Her research focuses on the practice of Inuit artists within urban spaces and the role of art in the construction of place. Amy holds a BA and an MA in Art History, both from Carleton University. Her writing has been featured in Inuit Art Quarterly and esse arts + opinions.

Charissa von Harringa is a PhD Researcher in Art History at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology from New York University (2007) and an M.A. in Art History from Concordia University (2016). Von Harringa’s academic area of focus lies at the intersection of several fields including Circumpolar, Indigenous, Memory and Performance Studies. Through her doctoral work she examines the media-based practices, archival dispositions, and networked agencies of pan-Inuit and Sámi artists. These are analyzed as they engage past and present Arctic discourse, elaborate new functions of tradition and modernity, and clarify the ever-evolving nexus of theory and practice in contemporary art towards sovereign ends. She has several published essays and reviews in Inuit Art Quarterly and RACAR: revue d'art canadienne / Canadian Art Review, among others.

Artist Biographies

asinnajaq
Inukjuak, Nunavik and Montreal, Quebec

asinnajaq is an Inuit artist from Inukjuak, Nunavik. Her film, Three Thousand (2017), blends archival footage with animation to imagine her home community of Inukjuak from the past into the future. Three Thousand won Best Experimental film at the 2017 imagiNATIVE media arts festival, and was nominated for Best Short Documentary at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards. She is a laureate of the REVEAL Indigenous Art Award in 2017 and the Toronto Film Critics Association’s Technicolour Clyde Gilmour Award in 2018. She is one of the curators of Tillitarniit, a three-day festival in Montreal which celebrates Inuit culture. asinnajaq was apart of the curatorial team that worked with Isuma on their representation of Canada at the 2019 Venice Biennial. She is also be on the curatorial team working on the inaugural exhibition of the Inuit Art Center opening in 2020.

Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
Iqaluit, Nunavut

Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory is an artist that applies her study of uaajeerneq (Greenlandic mask dancing) and understandings of Inuit philosophies into many genres, from performance art and theatre to writing and curatorial work. Co-winner of the 2018 Dora Award for most outstanding play and of the inaugural Kenojuaq Ashevak Memorial Award from the Inuit Art Foundation, Laakkuluk is the first Artistic Director of Qaggiavuut, a nonprofit society in Nunavut supporting Inuit artists and advocating for a Nunavut performing arts centre. Laakkuluk lives in Iqaluit with her husband and three children.

Kablusiak
Mohkinstsis (Calgary), Alberta

Kablusiak is an Inuvialuk artist and curator based in Mohkinstsis and holds a BFA in Drawing from the Alberta University of the Arts. They are represented by Jarvis Hall Gallery, and their work has been acquired by public and private collections across so-called Canada. Kablusiak is a board member of Stride Gallery (2016-present). Awards include the Alberta Foundation for the Arts Young Artist Prize (2017) and the Primary Colours Emerging Artist Award (2018). A multi-disciplinary artist, they imbue a variety of mediums with their trademark ironic humour to address cultural displacement. The light-hearted nature of their practice extends gestures of empathy and solidarity; these interests invite a reconsideration of the perceptions of contemporary Indigeneity. Kablusiak, along with three Inuit curators, will be creating the inaugural exhibition of the new Inuit Art Centre in 2020, and they are shortlisted for the 2019 Sobey Art Award, representing the Prairies and the North.

Carola Grahn
Malmö, Sweden and Kittelfjäll, Sápmi

Carola Grahn is a Sámi visual artist based out Malmö, Sweden and Kittelfjäll in Sápmi. Grahn works primarily with materializations of text, installation strategies and sculptural media. Her affective text- and sound-based sculptural installations lend poetic dialogue to the contexts of place, labour, and identity that are attuned to the slippages of language and representation in art while complicating cultural and gendered social constructions of the North. Carola is an internationally-known artist in northern Scandinavia and abroad, whose work has been shown at Southbank Centre, 2017 (London, UK), Carleton University Art Gallery, 2017 (Ottawa), Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba, 2017 (Brandon), Office of Contemporary Art Norway, 2017, Tråante, 2017 (Nor), Havremagasinet, 2016 (Sweden), Art Centre KulttuuriKauppila, 2016 (Fin), Bildmuseet, Umeå (Swe), 2014, Galleri Jinsuni, Seoul, 2014 (South Korea) amongst other places. Grahn has been the guest editor of Hjärnstorm magazine 2017, she has written for Afterall (2017) and published the conceptual novel Lo & Professorn (2013). Grahn’s work is also represented in the Swedish Art Council’s collection.

Marja Helander
Utsjok and Helsinki, Finland

Marja Helander is a video artist and photographer based in Utsjok and Helsinki, Finland. Her multi-media practice draws from her Sámi and Finnish ancestry. Helander explores themes related to femininity, identity and the tension between traditional Sámi ways of life and modern Finnish society. Her recent work concentrates on post-colonial topics among Sámi including industry and resource extraction in the North with photography and video art that feature the Northern landscape and Sami issues of modernity through a tragicomic lens. Although originally trained as a painter, Helander decided to pursue her interest in photography, graduating from the University of Art and Design in Helsinki in 1999. Since then she has presented works in solo and group exhibitions both in Finland and abroad, with many shows in northern Scandinavia, Canada, South Africa, and Mali. Her video work Dolastallat won the Kent Monkman award at imagineNATIVE Film + Media Arts Festival in Toronto, 2016. In 2017, Helander was chosen as the Finnish Cultural Institute in New York’s artist-in-residency. Her recent short, Birds in the Earth won Risto Jarva Prize and the Main Prize in the National Competition in the Tampere Film Festival 2018 in Finland. Helander´s works are also included in collections in several Scandinavian museums and in the National Gallery of Canada. Helander has also made a public artwork So Everything Flourishesfor the Sámi Cultural Centre Sajos, in Inari.

Sonya Kelliher-Combs
Nome, Alaska

Sonya Kelliher-Combs is an Iñupiaq and Athabascan artist from the Alaskan community of Nome. Through her mixed media painting and sculpture, Kelliher-Combs offers a chronicle of the ongoing struggle for self-definition and identity in the Alaskan context. Her combination of shared iconography with intensely personal imagery demonstrates the generative power that each vocabulary has over the other. Similarly, her use of synthetic, organic, traditional and modern materials dissolves binaries of Western/Native culture, self/other and man/nature, to examine their interrelationships and interdependence while also questioning accepted notions of beauty. Kelliher-Combs’s work has been shown in numerous individual and group exhibitions, including the national exhibition Changing Hands 2: Art without Reservation and the inaugural Sakahàn quinquennial of Indigenous art at the National Gallery of Canada in 2013. Recent exhibitions include Hide: Skin as Material and Metaphor at the National Museum of American Indian Art in 2010 and the traveling exhibition THIS IS DISPLACEMENT: Native Artists Consider the Relationship Between Land and Identity in 2011.

Joar Nango
Alta and Tromsø, Norway

Joar Nango is a Sámi and Norwegian architect and visual artist, born in Alta, Norway, and who currently lives and works in Tromsø, Norway. His varied practices often involve site-specific performances and structural installations which explore the intersection of architecture and visual art, drawing from both his Sámi heritage and Western culture. Nango is a co-founder of the architecture collective FFB, who create temporary installations in urban settings. He has exhibited in Canada at Western Front (Vancouver, 2014) and Gallery 44 (Toronto, 2016) and internationally at 43SNA, Medellin (Colombia, 2013), and the Norwegian Sculpture Biennale at Vigelandsmuseet (Oslo, Norway, 2013). One of his recent projects was European Everything (2017) at Documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, an extensive installation and performance which involved collaborations with Sámi and European artists, writers, poets and musicians.

Taqralik Partridge
Kuujjuaq, Nunavik

Taqralik Partridge is an Inuk artist, writer, curator, throatsinger, and spoken word poet. She is originally from Kuujjuaq in Nunavik, although she now splits her time between Canada and Kautokeino in northern Sápmi. Partridge’s writing focuses on both life in the north and on the experiences of Inuit living in the south. Partridge co-founded the Tusarniq festival held in Montreal. Her performance work has been featured on CBC radio one and she has toured with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra. Partridge has also worked as Director of Communications for the Avataq Cultural Institute. In 2010, her short story Igloolik won first prize in the Quebec Writing Competition and the same year she was a featured artist onstage at the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver. In 2018, Partridge was named as a finalist for the CBC Short Story Prize. Partridge is Editor-at-Large for the Inuit Art Quarterly. Her work will be featured as an official selection at the Sydney Biennale in Sydney, Australia in 2020.

Barry Pottle
Rigolet, Nunatsiavut and Ottawa, Ontario

Barry Pottle is an Inuk artist from Nunatsiavut in Labrador (Rigolet), now living in Ottawa, Ontario. He has worked with the Indigenous arts community for many years particularly in the city of Ottawa. Barry has always been interested in photography as a medium of artistic expression and as a way of exploring the world around him. Living in Ottawa, which has the largest urban population of Inuit outside the North, Barry has been able to stay connected to the greater Inuit community. Through the camera’s len, Barry showcases the uniqueness of this community. Whether it is at a cultural gathering, family outings or the solitude of nature that photography allows, he captures the essence of Inuit life in Ottawa. From a regional perspective, living in the Nation’s Capital allows him to travel throughout the valley and beyond to explore and photograph people, places and events, as well as articulate and interrogate the emergent identity of an “urban Inuk.” His projects have included the “Foodland Security”series which highlights the importance of access to country food in urban communities and the “Awareness” series which documents the history of the Eskimo ID tags and the elders who wore them. Mostly self-taught, his work is rooted in photojournalism. His work can be seen in the collections of the National Gallery of Canada, the Canadian Museum of History, and Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada.

Inuuteq Storch
Sisimiut, Greenland and Copenhagen, Denmark

Inuuteq Storch is a Kalaallit visual artist, photographer, musician and author based in Copenhagen, Denmark and Sisimiut, Greenland. Storch received his photography certifications from the International Center of Photography in New York in 2016, and at Fatamorgana in Copenhagen in 2011. The artist’s practice in photography, film, video, music and installation, incorporates archival and contemporary images to comment on colonialism and the present day impacts and realities of modernization on Greenlandic communities. He is the author of Porcelain Souls (2018), a collection of family photos and letters from Greenland in the 1960s, and anticipates a forthcoming publication this December. Storch has participated in several festivals and major international solo and group exhibitions including: Old Films of the New Tale (Sisimiut Culture House, Greenland, 2017) and Run Away For Mother Earth (Katuaq, Nuuk Culture house, 2012). His group shows include Chirts & Cloves (Nuuk Kunst Museum and Sisimiut Culture House, 2018), Notas Al Futuro (Espacio El Pasajero, Bogota, Colombia, 2017), and the Pop Up Archive Exhibition, MANA (New Jersey, 2017).

Couzyn van Heuvelen
Iqaluit, Nunavut and Toronto, Ontario

Couzyn van Heuvelen is an Inuit artist born in Iqaluit but who has lived most of his life in Southern Ontario. His artistic practice blends modern fabrication techniques with Inuit tradition to create “hybrid” objects that explore both cultural tensions and synchronicities. Van Heuvelen holds a BFA from York University and an MFA from NSCAD University. His work has been included in several group exhibitions across Canada. Recently, van Heuvelen created an aluminum qamutiik sculpture at the Southway Inn in Ottawa, Ontario for the Lost Stories Project commemorating the historical significance of the hotel being a landing point for Inuit traveling south for school, employment and medical care. In 2017, van Heuvelen was chosen as the Sheridan College Temporary Contemporary Artist in Residence and the subsequent work, Nitsiit (2017) was featured at Sheridan’s Hazel McCallion Campus in Mississauga.

Allison Akootchook Warden
Kaktovik and Fairbanks, Alaska

Allison Warden is an Iñupiaq interdisciplinary visual and performance artist who raps under the name AKU-MATU. She was born in Fairbanks, Alaska with close ties to Kaktovik, Alaska and is now based in Anchorage. Warden’s practice weaves together Iñupiaq narratives and traditions from the past, present, and imagined futures. She is the creator of one-woman show, “Calling All Polar Bears” which in 2011 was part of a National Performance Network residency. Her most recent work is Unipkaaġusiksuġuvik (the place of the future/ancient) at the Anchorage Museum in Alaska in 2016, featured an extensive performative installation piece in which she was present in the gallery for 390 hours over two months. As AKU-MATU, she performed at the Riddu Riddu Music Festival in 2018 as part of the Inuit Circumpolar Hip-Hop Collaboration. In 2018, Warden was awarded the Rasmuson Individual Artist Fellowship in the new genre category.

 

Produced and circulated by: Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Patron Sponsor: Birch Hill Equity Partners
Supported by: Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage), Initiative for Indigenous Futures and Nexus Investments

 

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

 

Image: Marja Helander, Dolastallat (To have a campfire), 2016. Video still. Video, colour, sound, 5 min. 48 sec.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. West)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x265
Cost: 
Free
Image: Marja Helander, Dolastallat (To have a campfire), 2016. Video still. Courtesy of the artist.

Certified: Exhibition in Continuing Studies at OCADU

Event Poster featuring an painting of 2 kids in front of a background with butterflies
Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 10:30pm to Friday, March 11, 2016 - 10:00pm

An exhibition featuring artists who have completed a Continuing Studies certificate at OCAD University.

The Office of Continuing Studies offers six certificates that provide formal recognition of completed qualifying courses. Students must complete five courses within three years to qualify for the certificates to qualify for the Digital Media Skills Certificate, Art and Design Studio Skills Certificate, Photography Studio Skills Certificate, Web Design and Development Skills Certificate, Theory and Criticism in Art and Design Certificate, or the Certificate in Business Skills for Creative Professionals.

Works in the exhibition include Paintings, Drawings, Photography, Digital Design, and Video.

Open Mon- Fri, 9am-5pm

Reception: Thursday, February 4th, 5:30 - 7pm

Venue & Address: 
Office of Continuing Studies @ OCAD University 285 Dundas Street West
Website: 
http://ocadu.ca/continuingstudies
Email: 
continuingstudies@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416 977 6000 x 2321
Cost: 
Free

40, i nuovi 20 - forties are the new twenties

Monday, November 23, 2015 - 2:00pm to Monday, November 30, 2015 - 2:00am

40, i nuovi 20 - forties are the new twenties  is an exhibition that celebrates the milestone 40th year of OCAD University's Florence Off-campus Studies Program. Students from the 40th year of this one-of-a-kind studio-based experience will showcase their works, 40 pieces from 20 artists and designers, alongside a curated archival display celebrating the incredibly rich history of the program.

Monday, November 23 to Sunday, November 29

OCAD University Great Hall

This exhibition is generously supported by the Italian Cultural Institute and the Consulate General of Italy

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Great Hall, 2nd Floor 100 McCaul Street Toronto, ON
Email: 
jsuddick@ocadu.ca
2015 Florence students

CodeX: playable & disruptive futurist eArt

Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 6:00pm to Saturday, April 25, 2020 - 5:00pm

 

CodeX: playable & disruptive futurist eArt
January 22 to April 25, 2020

Free public reception
Wednesday, January 22 from 6 to 9 p.m.

Jason Baerg
Tom Barker
Rob Elsworthy
Samantha Fickel
Dennis Kavelman
Nick Puckett
Six Trends Inc.
Jane Tingley, Dr. Cindy Poremba and Marius Kintel

Curated by Tom Barker

This exhibition of leading-edge digital art, or eArt, investigates the future of human society through technology, innovation and design. It encourages audiences to reflect on the symbiotic relationship between technology and human society, and the resulting possibilities for our future through algorithms, identity and the nature of reality.

 

Curator Biography

Tom Barker has worked internationally as a multidisciplinary creative in the fields of design, art, and technology for many years. Tom’s diverse and ground-breaking collaborations have included the capsule and boarding design for the London Eye ferris wheel with David Marks Julia Barfield Architects; creating the world’s first Bluetooth headset for Emkay; and projects with the late architect Zaha Hadid for buildings, dance and opera stage sets. He curated The Art of Shopping for the Arts Council of England in 2002. Tom contributed an interactive futuristic 3D walkthrough entitled Masterplanners of the Universe: Brick Lane for the Barbican Arts Centre’s blockbuster global touring show Game On: 2002-2016. Tom collaborated with Langlands & Bell on the digital interactive artwork entitled The House of Osama Bin Laden which won a BAFTA and was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2004. He was the Founding Chair of the Digital Future programme at OCAD University 2012-2015. An author of many book chapters and papers, Tom’s book on Web App design was published by McGrawHill in 2019. A British citizen and permanent resident of Canada, Tom has lived and worked in the UK, Australia and Canada. He is currently the President and Chief technology Officer of Six Trends, a Toronto-based creative digital agency.

 

Artist Biographies

Jason Baerg is an Indigenous curator, educator, and visual artist. Curatorial contributions include developing and implementing the national Metis arts program for the Vancouver Olympics. Baerg graduated from Concordia University with a Bachelors of Fine Arts and a Masters of Fine Arts from Rutgers University. Dedicated to community development, he founded and incorporated the Metis Artist Collective and has served as volunteer Chair for such organizations as the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and the National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition. Creatively, as a visual artist, he pushes new boundaries in digital interventions in drawing, painting and new media installation. Recent international solo exhibitions include the Illuminato Festival in Toronto, Canada, the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia and the Digital Dome at the Institute of the American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Rob Elsworthy has worked as a Game Designer, Cinematic Animator, VFX Lead and a System Designer with Rockstar Games. His projects include games like Grand Theft Auto IV and V, Max Payne 3, Red Dead Redemption and the Warriors. Rob has won numerous awards for these projects also a four-time MMVA winner as a Music Video Director.

Samantha Fickel is a Canadian artist who completed an MFA in Art and Technology at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2016) and holds a BFA in Sculpture from OCAD University (2014). Using time-based, interactive, and immersive installations, she seeks to deconstruct familiar technologies in ways which invite unexpected sensory experiences. As one reviewer put it, her work observes that life is “equally vibrant on one side of a screen as another” (David Zarley, NewCityArt). Fickel’s work has shown in the flagship exhibition of Vector Festival Toronto (2017), and she recently had her first major solo exhibition at Stuart & Co Gallery in Chicago (2018).

Dennis Kavelman creates interactive digital art using machines, augmented reality, mobile devices, electronics and computers that use interaction to explore mortality and the passage of time. Dennis’ machine-based art is in the spirit of the mechanical computing that was initiated with the Jacquard loom in 1804 and Charles Babbage’s unfinished Analytical Engine in the 19th Century. Dennis’ work also resonates with the themes of control and communication explored by the Cyberneticists. An art collector as well as an artist, Dennis has a background in business and technology and was formerly an executive at Blackberry/Research in Motion. He is currently a partner at iNovia Venture Capital. Dennis has exhibited his work in Toronto at The Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in 2019, at The Spoke Club art gallery in 2018, Facebook’s offices in the MaRS building in 2017, and the Design Exchange’s EDIT show in 2017. His work was selected for exhibition at Governor’s Island New York City in 2018.

Nick Puckett is the Founding Director of Puckett Research+Design, a design practice focused on creating dynamic links between software, robotics, biological agents, chemical engineering, and material behaviour that generate new potentials for the design of intelligent environments. Nick is currently an Associate Professor, Co-Director of the ANThill Lab, and Chair of the Digital Futures undergraduate program at OCAD University. He has previously taught at institutions including The University of Kentucky, SCI-Arc, The Architectural Association, The University of Westminster, The University of Innsbruck, and The Royal College of Art.

Jane Tingley is an artist, curator, and Assistant Professor in Hybrid Practice at the University of Waterloo in Ontario Canada. She received the Kenneth Finkelstein Prize in Sculpture, and the first prize in the iNTERFACES – Interactive Art Competition in Porto, Portugal. She has participated in exhibitions and festivals in North and South America, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe including translife - International Triennial of Media Art at the National Art Museum of China, Beijing, Despertar/Éveil/Alive curated by Groupe Molior in São Paolo (BR) and Technosensual at the MuseumsQuartier in Vienna (AT).

Cindy Poremba is a digital media researcher, gamemaker and curator. She is an Assistant Professor (Digital Entertainment) at OCAD University who has published work in journals such as Games and Culture, Eludamos and Loading, as well as magazines and edited collections. Cindy also organizes non-traditional exhibitions as an independent curator, including Joue le jeu/Play Along (La Gaîté Lyrique, Paris), XYZ: Alternative Voices in Game Design (MODA, Atlanta), and “new arcade” events as a member of the kokoromi experimental game collective.

Marius Kintel is a professional software engineer who currently works at Thalmic Labs in Kitchener Ontario. As an artist Marius works with non-traditional materials and repurposes things and technology in unusual ways. His projects include multiple creations in the computer art subculture known as the demoscene, building a company in Norway that develops Open Source 3D graphics software, developing self replicating machines in the REPRAP project, as well as he is the primary developer of openSCAD.

 

 

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery, OCAD University
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
CodeX

Peter Morin: Reciprocity with Among All These Tundras

Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 6:30pm

Peter Morin: Reciprocity with Among All These Tundras
Thursday, November 14, 2019
6:30 p.m.

Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond St. West

Free event as part of Onsite Gallery's public event program for ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.


Join Peter Morin for a performative reciprocal exchange with the artworks in ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.

Peter Morin is a grandson of Tahltan ancestor artists. He has now lived away from his home territory for most of his life, but like his ancestors who have walked on the land, he carries Tahltan knowledge, ideas and history with him wherever he is. Every step along the way, Tahltan knowledge has guided his researching, dreaming, learning, making of the past twenty years of artistic and curatorial practice. Ideas and artwork can travel and bodies are their can be a vehicles for ideas to travel. The Tahltan Nation is currently comprised of three communities located in british columbia: Iskut, Dease Lake, and Telegraph Creek. The Tahltan Nation territory is 3857. 06 kms from Peter’s current home Toronto ON. Tahltan leaders signed a Declaration of Independence from canada on Oct 18, 1910. Morin began art school in 1997, completing his Bachelor of Fine Arts at Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in Vancouver in 2001 and his Masters in Fine Arts in 2010 at the University of British Columbia-Okanagan. Initially trained in lithography, Morin’s artistic practice moves from printmaking to poetry to installation to performance art. Peter is the son of Janelle Morin (Crow Clan, Tahltan Nation) and Pierre Morin (Quebecois). Peter was given the Tahltan name Ezeck-Tah by his grandmother Dinah Creyke when he turned 13. Throughout his exhibition and making history, Peter has focused upon his matrilineal inheritances in homage to the matriarchal structuring of the Tahltan Nation. Morin was longlisted for the Brink and Sobey Awards, in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In 2016, Morin received the Hnatyshyn Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement by a Canadian Mid-Career Artist. Morin currently holds a tenured appointment in the Faculty of Arts at the Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto.

 

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ
Among All These Tundras

September 18 to December 7, 2019

ᐊᓯᓐᓇᔭᖅ
asinnajaq
ᓛᑯᓗᒃ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻᓴᓐ ᐸᑦᑑᕆ
Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
ᑲᕈᓚ ᑯᕋᕼᐊᓐ
Carola Grahn
ᒫᔾᔭ ᕼᐋᓕᓐᑐ ᐅᓇᓗ ᓵᒥ ᕕᓐᓚᓐᒥᐅᑕᖅ
Marja Helander
ᖃᑉᓗᓯᐊᖅ
Kablusiak
ᓵᓐᔭ ᑲᓕᕼᐅ-ᑰᒻᔅ
Sonya Kelliher-Combs
ᔪᐊᖅ ᓇᓐᑰ
Joar Nango
ᑕᕐᕋᓕᒃ ᐹᑐᔨ
Taqralik Partridge
ᐱᐅᓕ ᐸᑐ
Barry Pottle
ᐃᓅᑎᖅ ᓯᑐᐊᑦᔅ
Inuuteq Storch
ᑲᔨᓐ ᐸᓐ ᕼᐅᕕᓕᓐ
Couzyn van Heuvelen
ᐊᓕᓴᓐ ᐊᑰᑦᓲᒃ ᒍᐊᑕᓐ
Allison Akootchook Warden

ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᑲᒪᔨᑦ: Hᐃᑐ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᐅᖅᑎ, ᐋᐃᒥ ᐳᕈᑎ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᕆᓴ ᐹᓐ ᕼᐃᐅᓕᒐ
Curated by Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

ᓴᕿᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᑖᒃᑯᓇᖓᑦ ᓕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐲᓇ ᐊᓕᓐ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᒃ, ᑳᓐᑯᑎᐊ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃᔪᐊᖅ
Produced and circulated by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University

Among All These Tundras, a title taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. Together, their works politically and poetically express current Arctic concerns towards land, language, sovereignty and resurgence. Click here to read more.

Produced and circulated by: Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Patron Sponsor: Birch Hill Equity Partners
Supported by: Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage), Initiative for Indigenous Futures and Nexus Investments

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. West)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
Peter Morin

Curators’ Tour with Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

Friday, September 27, 2019 - 6:30pm

Curators’ Tour with Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa
Friday, September 27, 2019
6:30 p.m.

Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond St. West

Free event as part of Onsite Gallery's public event program for ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.


Join Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa for a curatorial tour of ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras, a group exhibition that features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world.

 

Dr. Heather Igloliorte is the University Research Chair in Indigenous Circumpolar Arts at Concordia University in Tiohtiá:ke/Montreal, where she also leads the Inuit Futures in Arts Leadership SSHRC Partnership Grant and Co-Directs the Initiative for Indigenous Futures Cluster (IIF) in the Milieux Institute for Arts, Culture and Technology with Professor Jason Edward Lewis. Igloliorte currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Indigenous Circle for the Winnipeg Art Gallery, working on the development of the new national Inuit Art Centre; on the Board of Directors for North America's largest Indigenous art historical association, the Native North American Art Studies Association; is Vice-President of the Inuit Art Foundation; and sits on the Faculty Council of the Otsego Institute for Native American Art History at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, New York, among others.

Amy Dickson is an emerging curator and doctoral student in the Art History program at Concordia University. Her research focuses on the practice of Inuit artists within urban spaces and the role of art in the construction of place. Amy holds a BA and an MA in Art History, both from Carleton University. Her writing has been featured in Inuit Art Quarterly and esse arts + opinions.

Charissa von Harringa is a PhD Researcher in Art History at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. She holds a B.A. in Anthropology from New York University (2007) and an M.A. in Art History from Concordia University (2016). Von Harringa’s academic area of focus lies at the intersection of several fields including Circumpolar, Indigenous, Memory and Performance Studies. Through her doctoral work she examines the media-based practices, archival dispositions, and networked agencies of pan-Inuit and Sámi artists. These are analyzed as they engage past and present Arctic discourse, elaborate new functions of tradition and modernity, and clarify the ever-evolving nexus of theory and practice in contemporary art towards sovereign ends. She has several published essays and reviews in Inuit Art Quarterly and RACAR: revue d'art canadienne / Canadian Art Review, among others.

 

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ
Among All These Tundras

September 18 to December 7, 2019

ᐊᓯᓐᓇᔭᖅ
asinnajaq
ᓛᑯᓗᒃ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻᓴᓐ ᐸᑦᑑᕆ
Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
ᑲᕈᓚ ᑯᕋᕼᐊᓐ
Carola Grahn
ᒫᔾᔭ ᕼᐋᓕᓐᑐ ᐅᓇᓗ ᓵᒥ ᕕᓐᓚᓐᒥᐅᑕᖅ
Marja Helander
ᖃᑉᓗᓯᐊᖅ
Kablusiak
ᓵᓐᔭ ᑲᓕᕼᐅ-ᑰᒻᔅ
Sonya Kelliher-Combs
ᔪᐊᖅ ᓇᓐᑰ
Joar Nango
ᑕᕐᕋᓕᒃ ᐹᑐᔨ
Taqralik Partridge
ᐱᐅᓕ ᐸᑐ
Barry Pottle
ᐃᓅᑎᖅ ᓯᑐᐊᑦᔅ
Inuuteq Storch
ᑲᔨᓐ ᐸᓐ ᕼᐅᕕᓕᓐ
Couzyn van Heuvelen
ᐊᓕᓴᓐ ᐊᑰᑦᓲᒃ ᒍᐊᑕᓐ
Allison Akootchook Warden

ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᑲᒪᔨᑦ: Hᐃᑐ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᐅᖅᑎ, ᐋᐃᒥ ᐳᕈᑎ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᕆᓴ ᐹᓐ ᕼᐃᐅᓕᒐ
Curated by Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

ᓴᕿᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᑖᒃᑯᓇᖓᑦ ᓕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐲᓇ ᐊᓕᓐ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᒃ, ᑳᓐᑯᑎᐊ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃᔪᐊᖅ
Produced and circulated by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University

Among All These Tundras, a title taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. Together, their works politically and poetically express current Arctic concerns towards land, language, sovereignty and resurgence. Click here to read more.

Produced and circulated by: Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Patron Sponsor: Birch Hill Equity Partners
Supported by: Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage), Initiative for Indigenous Futures and Nexus Investments

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

 

Image: asinnajaq, Rock Piece (Ahuriri edition), 2018. Video still. Video, colour, sound, 4 min. 2 sec.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery: 199 Richmond St. West
Website: 
https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/curators-tour-with-heather-igloliorte-amy-dickson-and-charissa-von-harringa-tickets-69783208455
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
asinnajaq, Rock Piece (Ahuriri edition), 2018. Video still. Video, colour, sound, 4 min. 2 sec.

Land – LIMINALITY- Loss

The exhibition Land - LIMINALITY - Loss, curated by Assistant Professor Pam Patterson (Faculty of Art) and featuring work by undergraduate student Angie Ma (Faculty of Art), Pam Patterson, graduate student Vicky Talwar and OCAD staff member Leila Talei (Officer, Research Projects, Office of Research & Innovation), is part of an investigation into the intersection of land and loss with historical/cultural disruption and change.

As long as they live in the duality in which to be is to be like, and to be like is to be like the oppressor, this contribution is impossible.

Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed, 1992, p 33

Jackson 2Bears (in Spicanovic, 2018, p. 160) writes “that history is something ‘written on the land’… From this perspective … [how might we endeavor to explore] how narratives are inextricably interconnected with ‘place’…” 

How though, somewhat antithetic to this, might narratives, histories and stories explicate ‘land’ displacement? How might we explore the political and cultural implications of these histories and stories, both personal and collective, around this intersection of land with historical and cultural disruption and change?

Troubled by this complex relationship of land and loss Ma, Patterson, Talwar and Talei, as settler/immigrants, in exhibition and conversation, occupy a problematic liminal space, a space adrift where the threat of homelessness looms.

Questions Camille Nelson (2004):

Does anyone really have such a habitat anymore?... One’s identity is attached to one’s knowledge, body and sense of home. If one is without a home, one’s identity is compromised either one is identity-less, or one is multiply constructed across time, space and location. The situation is compounded when one’s dislocation is forced or less than fully free… Identity[’s] temporal component… resonates over time, making historical legacy tangible and relevant today. The ancestral self and contemporary self can collide when the realities of one’s present situation forces the submergence or repression of… cherished identities. 

Often this historical and contemporary crisis is as a result of an inherited colonial legacy. The construction is about power. Many who were able to flee and/or were lured to Canada bear the trappings of the rewards they reaped from this place to which they migrated. But didn’t the acquisition of privilege and power have something to do with why they/we left in the first place? (194).

How might we explore the political and cultural implications of histories and stories, both personal and collective, around the intersection of land and cultural disruption and change? 

 At a moment when OCAD University is embracing a holistic Indigenous curriculum, such conversations are key to examining complex and often troubling relationships. This multi-media exhibit invites the community to explore their own histories and stories within this context in exhibition, conversation and workshop. Land - LIMINALITY - Loss is on display at OCAD University's Graduate Gallery from September 3, 2019 to September 6, 2019. 

Works displayed:

  • Patterson, Pam. Irish need not Apply. 2019. Mixed media prints.
  • Talwar, Vicky. A Journey Awaits. Acrylic and mixed media on canvas.
  • Talei, Leila. The Meticulous Documentation of a Personal Loss. 2019. Collage.
  • Ma, Angie. Elsewhere: Moments of Home. 2019. Watercolour, Chinese ink, rice paper and botanical hand dye on silk.

References:

  • Freire, Paulo (1992). Pedagogy of the Oppressed. New York: The Continuum Publishing Company
  • Nelson, Camille A. (2004). Adrift in the Diaspora. In Camille A. Nelson & Charmaine A. Nelson (Eds.) Racism Eh? A Critical interdisciplinary anthology of race and racism in Canada. Concord, ON: Captus Press. pp 175 205.
  • Spicanovic, Vladimir (2018). Pedagogies of the land. In Doug Wallace & Véronique Leblanc (Eds.) Landmarks2017: Art + places + perspectives. Toronto: The Magenta Foundation/Partners in Art. PP. 159 – 161.

We would like to acknowledge funding support from the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario.

 

Exhibition photographs by Miklos Legrady

 

Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - Installation by P. Patterson
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - installation by L. Talei
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - installation by P. Patterson
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - work by V. Talwar
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - work by A. Ma
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - work by P. Patterson
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - work by V. Talwar
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - work by A. Ma
Exhibition photograph by Miklos Legrady - installation by L. Talei
OAC logo
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 12:45pm
https://www2.ocadu.ca/event/land-%E2%80%93-liminality-loss
Lab Member: 
Pam Patterson

Land – LIMINALITY- Loss: Workshop on IDENTITY AND BELONGING

Wednesday, September 4, 2019 - 5:30pm to 8:00pm

About the Artist: Angie Ma is a DRPT major in her fourth year at OCADU. In her art practice, she reflects on her Chinese Canadian identity, expressing her thoughts, memories and desires through watercolour painting. She is actively pursuing art education as researcher and as educator. In her workshops, she collaborates with participants using storytelling to animate a dialogue that will connect everyone’s experiences.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Graduate Gallery (Ground Floor, 205 Richmond St. West)
Email: 
ppatterson@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

Land – LIMINALITY- Loss

Art by Pam Patterson, on view at the event.
Tuesday, September 3, 2019 - 12:00pm to Friday, September 6, 2019 - 5:00pm

About the exhibition:

How might we explore the political and cultural implications of histories and stories, both personal and collective, around the intersection of land and cultural disruption and change? Often this historical and contemporary crisis is as a result of an inherited colonial legacy. The construction is about power. Many who were able to flee and/or were lured to Canada bear the trappings of the rewards they reaped from this place to which they migrated. But didn’t the acquisition of privilege and power have something to do with why they/we left in the first place? 

Troubled by this complex relationship of land, loss and potential acquisition, undergraduate student Angie Ma (Faculty of Art), Assistant Professor Pam Patterson (Faculty of Art), graduate student Vicky Talwar and OCAD staff member Leila Talei (Officer, Research Projects, Office of Research & Innovation), as settler/immigrants, in exhibition and conversation, occupy a problematic liminal space, a space adrift. At a moment at OCAD U when we are embracing a holistic indigenous curriculum, such conversations are key to examining complex and often troubling relationships. This multi-media exhibit invites the community to explore their own histories and stories within this context in exhibition, conversation and workshop. 

The OCAD University Graduate Gallery is open from 12pm to 5pm daily.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Graduate Gallery (Ground floor, 205 Richmond St. West)
Email: 
ppatterson@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
Land Liminality Loss poster featuring cropped mixed media painting and collage from each artist with show date and location

Nithikul Nimkulrat, Associate Professor in the MAAD Program - exhibition

"The F(r)ame Without Painting, by Nithikul Nimkulrat
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 6:30am

Textile holds emotions and stories. Interwoven is an exhibition exploring ties between art and textile design, including a glimpse of bold new materials used by experimental designers. It interweaves fibres, techniques, textures and diverse materials into a tapestry fusing the legacy of contemporary art, ancient handicrafts, new technology and futuristic visions. A timeless source of warmth and security, textiles preserve an important fragment of human history, while also carrying on ancient techniques and narratives from generation to generation.

 

Artists:
Sheila Hicks, Hanna-Kaisa Korolainen, Maija Lavonen, Pia Männikkö, Nithikul Nimkulrat, Kärt Ojavee, Bella Rune, Kustaa Saksi, Sue Stone, Johanna Ulfsak, Timo Vaittinen, Sandra Wirtanen.

Venue & Address: 
Finland
Website: 
https://emmamuseum.fi/en/exhibitions/interwoven/.
Digital Screen: 

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