Public Talk - Cognitive Justice and Transsystemic Change: Indigenization in the Academy

Thursday, September 26, 2019 - 6:30pm

 

Presented as part of the Faculty & Curriculum Development Centre’s Indigenous Education Speaker Series to facilitate respectful knowledge-sharing, this free public education talk is open to all students, faculty, staff, and the broader community.
 

DR. MARIE BATTISTE, O.C.
COGNITIVE JUSTICE AND TRANSSYSTEMIC CHANGE: INDIGENIZATION IN THE ACADEMY

Thursday, September 26th, 2019 | 6:30pm - 8:30pm
OCAD University, 100 McCaul St, Room 190 (main auditorium)

Abstract:

“2015 was an auspicious, if not a heavy hitting year to universities. The Universities Canada issued their agreed upon Indigenization plan in 13 points to help universities and colleges address some common agreed upon ideas among the presidents for contributing to their concept of Indigenization. In the same year,  the Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its final report on the survivor testimonies and historical research of the Indian Residential Schools, together with its 94 Calls to Action directed to all levels of government, business, educational, social work and medical institutions, law, media, and civil society, to address the years of ignorance, hatred, racism, violence, silence, and systemic abuse of youth and intergeneration of Indigenous peoples caught in those institutions. These two documents have since stimulated an array of activity in PSE to address layers of inequities the system and societies have generated. This talk will examine diverse assumptions and outcomes of emergent changes in the conventional postsecondary education system and offer another decolonizing analysis and experiential thinking about needed changes when transsystemic change is respected and activated. How the directives to Indigenize the academy can be taken up and mobilized from another knowledge system is a premise of this talk for which I aspire to offer some perspectives and critique of assumptions and possible thoughts for decolonizing educational institutions and their foundations.” - Dr. Marie Battiste

Dr. Battiste’s talk will be followed by a question and answer period. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Marie Battiste is Mi'kmaq from Nova Scotia’s Potlotek First Nation and was recently awarded as an Officer of the Order of Canada, 2019. She is most well-known as an author and educator with immense contributions to the field of Indigenous education and an unflinching commitment to traditional languages and knowledges. Currently a professor at the University of Saskatchewan, she holds a Master's degree from Harvard and a PhD from Stanford University.

Venue & Address: 
100 McCaul Street, Room 190
Website: 
https://www.ocadu.ca/services/faculty-curriculum-development-centre/news-and-events.htm
Email: 
fcdc@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free
Poster of Dr. Marie Battiste event

Exhibition Tour with Peter Morin

Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 6:30pm

Exhibition Tour with Peter Morin
Thursday, November 14, 2019
6:30 p.m.

Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond St. West

Free event as part of Onsite Gallery's public event program for ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.


Join Peter Morin for an exhibition tour of ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras, a group exhibition that features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world.

Peter Morin is a Tahltan Nation artist and curator. Throughout his artistic practice, Morin investigates the impact zones that occur when Indigenous practices collide with Western-settler colonialism. Morin’s artworks are shaped, and reshaped, by Tahltan epistemological production and often take on the form of performance interventions. Morin’s practice has spanned twenty years so far, with exhibitions in London, Berlin, Singapore, and New Zealand, as well as across Canada and the United States. In addition to his exhibition history, Morin has curated exhibitions for the Museum of Anthropology, Western Front, Bill Reid Gallery, and Burnaby Art Gallery. He was longlisted for the Brink and Sobey Awards, in 2013 and 2014, respectively. In 2016, Morin received the Hnatyshyn Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement by a Canadian Mid-Career Artist. He holds a SSRHRC grant, Crossing media, Crossing Canada: performing the land we are, which explores the meeting up of media and durational performance. Morin is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Arts at the Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto.

 

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ
Among All These Tundras

September 18 to December 7, 2019

ᐊᓯᓐᓇᔭᖅ
asinnajaq
ᓛᑯᓗᒃ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻᓴᓐ ᐸᑦᑑᕆ
Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
ᑲᕈᓚ ᑯᕋᕼᐊᓐ
Carola Grahn
ᒫᔾᔭ ᕼᐋᓕᓐᑐ ᐅᓇᓗ ᓵᒥ ᕕᓐᓚᓐᒥᐅᑕᖅ
Marja Helander
ᖃᑉᓗᓯᐊᖅ
Kablusiak
ᓵᓐᔭ ᑲᓕᕼᐅ-ᑰᒻᔅ
Sonya Kelliher-Combs
ᔪᐊᖅ ᓇᓐᑰ
Joar Nango
ᑕᕐᕋᓕᒃ ᐹᑐᔨ
Taqralik Partridge
ᐱᐅᓕ ᐸᑐ
Barry Pottle
ᐃᓅᑎᖅ ᓯᑐᐊᑦᔅ
Inuuteq Storch
ᑲᔨᓐ ᐸᓐ ᕼᐅᕕᓕᓐ
Couzyn van Heuvelen
ᐊᓕᓴᓐ ᐊᑰᑦᓲᒃ ᒍᐊᑕᓐ
Allison Akootchook Warden

ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᑲᒪᔨᑦ: Hᐃᑐ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᐅᖅᑎ, ᐋᐃᒥ ᐳᕈᑎ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᕆᓴ ᐹᓐ ᕼᐃᐅᓕᒐ
Curated by Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

ᓴᕿᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᑖᒃᑯᓇᖓᑦ ᓕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐲᓇ ᐊᓕᓐ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᒃ, ᑳᓐᑯᑎᐊ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃᔪᐊᖅ
Produced and circulated by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University

Among All These Tundras, a title taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. Together, their works politically and poetically express current Arctic concerns towards land, language, sovereignty and resurgence. Click here to read more.

Produced and circulated by: Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Patron Sponsor: Birch Hill Equity Partners
Supported by: Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage), Initiative for Indigenous Futures and Nexus Investments

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. West)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
Peter Morin

Exhibition Tour with Ryan Rice

Thursday, October 17, 2019 - 6:30pm

Exhibition Tour with Ryan Rice
Thursday, October 17, 2019
6:30 p.m.

Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond St. West

Free event as part of Onsite Gallery's public event program for ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras.


Join Ryan Rice for an exhibition tour of ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ / Among All These Tundras, a group exhibition that features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world.

Ryan Rice, Kanien’kehá:ka, is an independent curator and the Associate Dean in the Faculty of Liberal Arts / School of Interdisciplinary Studies at OCAD University, Toronto.

His curatorial career spans 25 years in museums and galleries. Rice served as the Chief Curator at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and also held curatorial positions at the Indigenous Art Centre (Ottawa, ON), named curatorial fellowships with the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria (Victoria, BC) and the Walter Phillips Gallery (Banff, AB), and held the position of Aboriginal Curator-In-Residence at the Carleton University Art Gallery. He received a Master of Arts degree in Curatorial Studies from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York; graduated from Concordia University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts and received an Associate of Fine Arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Rice’s writing on contemporary Onkwehonwe art has been published in numerous periodicals and exhibition catalogues, and he has lectured widely. Some of his exhibitions include raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015), ANTHEM: Perspectives on Home and Native Land, FLYING STILL: CARL BEAM 1943-2005, Oh So Iroquois, Scout’s Honour, Hochelaga Revisited, Soul Sister: Re-imagining Kateri Tekakwitha, Counting Coup, and Stands With A Fist: Contemporary Native Women Artists. Rice was also a co-founder and former director of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and currently sits on the Inuit Art Foundation Board of Directors. His recent curatorial projects include the touring exhibition BAIT: Couzyn van Heuvelen and the Nuit Blanche 2019 project with the Placeholders collective, Listen to the Land.

 

ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ
Among All These Tundras

September 18 to December 7, 2019

ᐊᓯᓐᓇᔭᖅ
asinnajaq
ᓛᑯᓗᒃ ᐅᐃᓕᐊᒻᓴᓐ ᐸᑦᑑᕆ
Laakkuluk Williamson Bathory
ᑲᕈᓚ ᑯᕋᕼᐊᓐ
Carola Grahn
ᒫᔾᔭ ᕼᐋᓕᓐᑐ ᐅᓇᓗ ᓵᒥ ᕕᓐᓚᓐᒥᐅᑕᖅ
Marja Helander
ᖃᑉᓗᓯᐊᖅ
Kablusiak
ᓵᓐᔭ ᑲᓕᕼᐅ-ᑰᒻᔅ
Sonya Kelliher-Combs
ᔪᐊᖅ ᓇᓐᑰ
Joar Nango
ᑕᕐᕋᓕᒃ ᐹᑐᔨ
Taqralik Partridge
ᐱᐅᓕ ᐸᑐ
Barry Pottle
ᐃᓅᑎᖅ ᓯᑐᐊᑦᔅ
Inuuteq Storch
ᑲᔨᓐ ᐸᓐ ᕼᐅᕕᓕᓐ
Couzyn van Heuvelen
ᐊᓕᓴᓐ ᐊᑰᑦᓲᒃ ᒍᐊᑕᓐ
Allison Akootchook Warden

ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᖕᒥ ᑲᒪᔨᑦ: Hᐃᑐ ᐃᒡᓗᓕᐅᖅᑎ, ᐋᐃᒥ ᐳᕈᑎ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᓴᕆᓴ ᐹᓐ ᕼᐃᐅᓕᒐ
Curated by Heather Igloliorte, Amy Dickson and Charissa von Harringa

ᓴᕿᑕᐅᔪᖅ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᑐᓂᔭᐅᔪᖅ ᑖᒃᑯᓇᖓᑦ ᓕᓄᑦ ᐊᒻᒪᓗ ᐲᓇ ᐊᓕᓐ ᓴᓇᖕᖑᐊᖅᓯᒪᔪᓂᒃ ᑕᑯᔭᒐᖃᕐᕕᒃ, ᑳᓐᑯᑎᐊ ᐃᓕᓐᓂᐊᕐᕕᒃᔪᐊᖅ
Produced and circulated by the Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University

Among All These Tundras, a title taken from the poem ‘My Home Is in My Heart’ by famed Sámi writer Nils-Aslak Valkeapää, features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. Together, their works politically and poetically express current Arctic concerns towards land, language, sovereignty and resurgence. Click here to read more.

Produced and circulated by: Leonard & Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Concordia University
Patron Sponsor: Birch Hill Equity Partners
Supported by: Canada Council for the Arts, Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (Mobilizing Inuit Cultural Heritage), Initiative for Indigenous Futures and Nexus Investments

Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events. The gallery is located at 199 Richmond St. W, Toronto, ON, M5V 0H4. Telephone: 416-977-6000, ext. 265. Opening hours are: Wednesdays to Fridays from noon to 7 p.m.; Saturdays from noon to 5 p.m. Free admission.

Onsite Gallery acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper. Onsite Gallery logo by Dean Martin Design.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. West)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
Ryan Rice

Summer Institute '19: Spotlight on Indigenous Filmmaking with Suzanne Morrissette

Thursday, June 13, 2019 - 6:00pm to 10:00pm

Join us for a Spotlight on Contemporary Indigenous Filmmaking! The evening begins with a talk featuring curator Suzanne Morrissette (OCAD University) and artists Lisa Myers and Fallon Simard, followed by stunning outdoor projections of short films against the walls of the historic Jacob Stong Barn at sundown.

FREE + open to the public!

6:00 - 7:30 PM - Curator Talk, York University, Nat Taylor Cinema N102 Ross Building

9:00 PM - Outdoor Projections, York University, Jacob Stong Barn

The program includes works by Richelle Bear Hat, Thirza Cuthand, Louis-Philippe Moar, Caroline Monnet, Lisa Myers, Jessie Short, and Fallon Simard:

In Her Care (dir. Richelle Bear Hat), 10 min.

Reclamation (dir. Thirza Cuthand), 13 min.

Kick It Now (dir. Louis-Philippe Moar), 3 min.

Portrait of an Indigenous Woman (dir. Caroline Monnet), 16 min.

And from the on we lived on blueberries for about a week (dir. Lisa Myers), 7 min.

Wake Up! (dir. Jessie Short), 6 min.

Land Becomes Ghost (dir. Fallon Simard), 1 min.

---

Suzanne Morrissette is a Metis artist, curator, and scholar from Winnipeg researching reactions to Indigenous political thought and curatorial strategies for centering Indigenous knowledge.

Archive/Counter-Archive is a SSHRC project led by Janine Marchessault, dedicated to researching and remediating audiovisual archives created by women, Indigenous Peoples, the LGBTQ2+ community, and immigrant communities. Political, resistant, and community-based, counter-archives disrupt conventional narratives and enrich our histories.

2019 Summer Institute: Archives/Counter-Archives is convened by Philip Hoffman, Janine Marchessault, and Michael Zryd. Free and public screenings, panels, and master classes will be held at the TIFF Bell Lightbox and York University, and will feature special guests such as Matthias Müller, Ali Kazimi, Yvonne Ng, and Suzanne Morrisette. Visit here for details: https://counterarchive.ca/summer-institute-archivecounter-archives

Venue & Address: 
York University, Nat Taylor Cinema, N102 Ross Building
Website: 
www.counterarchive.ca
Cost: 
Free
Spotlight on Contemporary Indigenous Filmmaking Poster

New childrens’ book illustrated by OCAD U grad Chief Lady Bird

Chief Lady Bird (left) and Sunshine Tenaso (right). Courtesy: Scholastic Books.
Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 3:15pm

Indigenous artist and OCAD U alumna Chief Lady Bird has illustrated a new children’s book, Nibi's Water Song, about the importance of clean water. Chief Lady Bird completed her BFA in Drawing and Painting with a minor in Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University in 2015. Written by Sunshine Tenasco, the founder of Her Braids, an organization committed to advocating for clean drinking water in Indigenous communities, the book will be published by Scholastic Books in July 2019.

Nibi is the Anishinaabemowin word for water. In Nibi's Water Song, an Indigenous girl named Nibi can't find clean water to drink. In the book, with no luck from her tap, or the nearby river, Nibi heads to the next town and starts knocking on doors looking for a safe source of drinking water.

Chief Lady Bird is Chippewa and Potawatomi from Rama and Moose Deer Point First Nations. Her Anishinaabe name is Ogimaakwebnes, which means Chief Lady Bird.  A CBC interview with Chief Lady Bird and Sunshine Tenasco is available online.  

"Land as Pedagogy" : an intimate story-telling experience

Woman at a podium facing an audience
Thursday, January 31, 2019

On the evening of Friday, January 18th, the Faculty & Curriculum Development Centre (FCDC) proudly hosted renowned Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg scholar, writer and artist Leanne Betasamosake Simpson who has been widely recognized as one of the most compelling Indigenous voices of her generation. Simpson, who is a member of Alderville First Nation, came to OCAD U to present a talk on “Land as Pedagogy,” followed by a question and answer period with students, faculty and staff in attendance.

Over 250 people filled the OCAD U auditorium, and listened intently as Simpson transformed the space into an intimate story-telling experience. Simpson’s work is known to break open the intersections between politics, story and song—bringing audiences into a rich and layered world of sound, light, and sovereign creativity. Simpson’s talk Friday evening did just that. Audience members cheered as Simpson dropped, in her words, “truth bombs” amidst her animated re-telling of three adaptations of a Nishnaabeg story about maple sugar.  

FCDC’s Nadia McLaren opened the event with a land acknowledgement and shared “I wish to also acknowledge there is still much work needed to be done to uncover the history and original names of this Land. I stand here, grateful for the wisdom of all who came before me, keeping in heart and mind our relations from the North – Giiwedinong, East – Waabanong, South – Zhaawanong and from the West – Ningaabi’anong.”

The evening culminated with a mesmerizing screening of Biidaaban (The Dawn Comes), a 19-minute stop-motion animation film, inspired by the poetic words of Leanne Simpson and directed by Vancouver based filmmaker, Amanda Strong. The short film, which made its screen debut at TIFF 2018, tells the story of Biidaaban, a non-binary character, who is accompanied by a 10,000-year-old shapeshifter and guide known as Sabe. Together they set out on a mission to reclaim the ceremonial harvesting of sap from maple trees.

All three stories shared by Simpson during the evening centered around this harvesting of sap from trees (something that Indigenous people have done since time immemorial) and all three centered Indigenous knowledges and relationships to land; a reclamation of land as pedagogy.

In an effort to facilitate respectful knowledge engagement and build meaningful and lasting relationships, Simpson’s lecture was part of a series of public education events being organized by the FCDC during the 2018-19 academic year to foster important and necessary dialogue across the university and support its goals around Indigenous curriculum development. The next event in the series is a screening of Muffins for Granny 

 

 

 

Poster: 
Auditorium, people looking at a projection
Shot of the audience, including President Sara Diamond
People looking at a film projection

OCAD U alumna appointed OAC Indigenous Arts Officer

Monday, January 7, 2019

The Ontario Arts Council (OAC) has appointed Erika Iserhoff as new Indigenous Arts Officer. Iserhoff holds a Bachelor of Design in Material Art & Design from OCAD University, where she also taught in the Indigenous Visual Culture program.

Iserhoff is a founding member of the Chocolate Woman Collective, a group of artists with a shared interest in research, exploration and practical application of Indigenous aesthetic principles in all areas of the dramatic arts. She is also the co-founder of the Setsuné Indigenous Fashion Incubator, which promotes the creation and exhibition of new works by Indigenous artists working in fashion, textiles and crafts. Iserhoff was associate producer of Tributaries, the opening night of Toronto’s 2017 Luminato festival, at which she was also announced as the Emerging Laureate of OAC’s Indigenous Arts Award. In 2009, she received a Dora Mavor Moore Award for her work in costume design in Indigenous theatre.

Iserhoff is of Omushkego and Eeyou Cree heritage, and is a member of Constance Lake First Nation. She is based in Toronto with her family.

Erika succeeds long-time OAC Indigenous Arts Officer Sara Roque, who stepped down in 2018.

Melissa General receives Emerging Leadership Award from Ontario Arts Council

Friday, December 14, 2018

Earlier this year, Melissa General, an OCAD U Photography alumna and the Manager of the university’s Indigenous Visual Culture Student Centre & Services, was selected to receive an emerging leadership award from the Ontario Arts Council. The award recognizes a rising Indigenous artist or arts professional with a $2,500 prize, with the recipient being nominated annually by the OAC’s annual Indigenous Arts Award winner, who was Nadya Kwandibens in 2018. Melissa received her honour at the OAC offices in a small ceremony on Tuesday, December 4. 

Melissa is Mohawk from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. She is a multidisciplinary artist working in photography, audio, video and installation. Her practice is focused on her home territory of Six Nations and the concepts of memory, language and land. Her work has been exhibited in galleries and shows in Ontario, Manitoba and Québec. She is also a contributor to the national billboard project Resilience, curated by Lee-Ann Martin. In addition to her BFA in Photography from OCAD U, Melissa holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from York University.

Congratulations Melissa! 

Poster: 
Carolyn Gloude, Awards Officer, Ontario Arts Council, Melissa General and Erika Iserhoff, Indigenous Culture Fund Grants Facilit

Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization

Saturday, November 10, 2018 - 9:00am

Discussions about Indigenizing the academy have abounded in Canada over the past few years. And yet, despite the numerous policies and reports that have been written, there is a lack of clarity around what pedagogical methods could help to decolonize our institutions. Sharing Breath: Embodied Learning and Decolonization edited by Sheila Batacharya and Yuk-Lin Renita Wong demonstrates how the academy cannot be decolonized while we still subscribe to the Western idea of mind over body. The book acknowledges and draws attention to the incommensurability between decolonization and aspects of social justice projects in education.

The contributors to this collection, including OCAD U’s Susan Ferguson, Director of the Writing and Learning Centre, argue that connecting the body, mind, and the spirit is integral to decolonization projects and to the reimagining of pedagogy. By providing a useful range of embodied ways of teaching, learning, and knowing for scholars to consider, this “field-building” book maps out an area for embodiment scholarship in education.

 

Venue & Address: 
University of Toronto OISE 252 Bloor St. W. Room 5-260
Cost: 
Free
poster for book launch

Forest Therapy at High Park

Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm

This three-hour guided activity and discussion, led by Carolynne Crawley, will focus on breaking down colonial ways of thinking that separate people from the their natural surroundings, and building responsible and reciprocal relations with the land. Crawley will integrate methods from the Japanese practice of Shinrin Yoku, or forest bathing, with traditional Indigenous knowledge to consider our relations with all beings, and connect with the land through all of our senses.

Carolynne Crawley is a Mi'kmaw woman with African and Celtic ancestry and a forest therapy trainer and mentor. She works as Indigenous Food Access Manager at Foodshare Toronto and is involved in environmental justice and food security. Crawley is interested in sharing her knowledge of traditional skills such as harvesting foods and medicines and has organized a three-month cross-cultural youth program, Teachings from the Land, that focuses on food justice and relationship with self, others and the land, as well as a province-wide Indigenous Food Sovereignty Gathering.

Please wear weather-appropriate clothing, sturdy footwear, and bring water and a snack. This is a low-energy activity, so check the weather and dress so that you will be able to keep warm while walking slowly and standing outdoors. We will meet at the north entrance to High Park, on the south-side of Bloor street, opposite High Park subway station.

Please confirm attendance by emailing amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca.

Unfortunately this event is not wheelchair accessible.

This activity is part of Decolonizing the Land, curriculum development project led by Professor Amish Morrell and supported by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. This initiative aims to explore ways of integrating land-based knowledge into artistic, pedagogical and curatorial practice, for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students and faculty.

Venue & Address: 
High Park North Entrance
Email: 
amorrell@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
FREE

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