Kathleen Vaughan: Finding Home

Friday, February 1, 2008 - 5:00am to Friday, February 29, 2008 - 5:00am

TYPE Books presents Finding Home: a Collage Installation about Self, Place, Community and Belonging by Kathleen Vaughan, OCAD Drawing & Painting Instructor.

Venue & Address: 
TYPE Books 883 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario
Email: 
kathleen@akaredhanded.com
Cost: 
Free

Book Launch: Body broken--Body redeemed: art of Maria Gabankova

Maria Gabankova
Wednesday, November 28, 2007 - 10:00pm to 11:30pm

Faculty of Art Professor Maria Gabankova celebrates the launch of her new book, Body broken--Body redeemed, published by Piquant in Great Britain.
The second volume in the Piquant Editions VISIBILIA series of 'visual biographies' features over 40 full-colour reproductions of paintings and installations by Czech-born Canadian artist Maria Gabankova. Introduced by John Franklin, director of the Imago arts organization in Canada.
'Gabankova's theology, like her art, sounds a wake-up call. It calls us to pay attention to the state of our world and the signs of our times. Nobody who passes by her art can fail to be touched, shaken or, indeed, shocked by the power of her imagery. It is, in one word, wake-up-art. More than that, however, it invites our tired, fragile and broken bodies to the wedding banquet of the Body Broken For You, where we can be fully re-nourished and redeemed.'
--Adrienne Dengerink Chaplin

Venue & Address: 
Rm 284 100 McCaul St., Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

We did everything adults would do. What went wrong? Johanna Householder and Frances Leeming

black and white photo of a young girl
Friday, November 13, 2015 - 5:00am to Saturday, December 12, 2015 - 5:00am

Opening Reception November 13th 6 - 8 PM
Curator Taryn Sirove
Panel Discussion Saturday Dec 12th 3-5pm
With Ian Carr-Harris and Dr. Hannah Dyer, moderated by Taryn Sirove

Titled after a misquote commonly attributed to William Golding’s 1954 novel Lord of the Flies, the exhibition, We did everything adults would do. What went wrong? can be understood as a single, collaborative installation by Frances Leeming and Johanna Householder. In a large-scale video projection at the center of the exhibition, the artists consider adult representations of children in conflict in two twentieth century films: Wee Willie Winkie (1937) and Lord of the Flies (1963). Reworking footage from these allegories for expansionist promotions of “civilization,” the artists put the two iconic protagonists—Winkie (Shirley Temple) and Piggy (Hugh Edwards)—into dialogue. Householder and Leeming tease out a pattern of similarities across shifting articulations of the original literature, isolating narrative constructions that betray the way we as adults symbolically project our own anxieties and ambitions onto figures of children, in these stories, using Western colonial vocabularies around conflict and war.

BIOGRAPHIES
Johanna Householder has been working at the intersection of popular and unpopular culture in performance, dance, video and intermedia art since the late 1970s. Shaping plundered source material in order to talk back to mass forms, Householder practices her own brand of cultural detournement, often in collaboration with other artists. She recently performed at Performancear o Morir in Chihuahua, at undisclosed territory in Java, and at M:ST in Calgary, AB. She is one of the founders of the 7a*11d International Festival of Performance Art and with Tanya Mars she edited Caught in the Act: an anthology of performance art by Canadian women (YYZ Books, 2005) - and they are currently at work on Volume Two.

Frances Leeming's performance, film and installation projects exploring the relationships between gender, technology and consumerism have been presented in Canada, Quebec, the U.S., Britain, Poland and Italy. Her feminist satire film animations The Orientation Express (1987) and Genetic Admiration (2005) have been showcased via film festivals and television broadcasts. Genetic Admiration is featured in Jackie Stacey's book The Cinematic Life of The Gene (2010). Leeming's performance history includes collaborations with Johanna Householder and Clive Robertson and kinetic installation works include Endeavour (2010) commissioned by the Media Gallery, Concordia University. Frances currently teaches Film and Media Studies at Queen's University, Kingston.

Taryn Sirove is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Law and Legal Studies at Carleton University, Ottawa. Her writing on the Ontario Censor Wars can be found in Explosion in the Movie Machine: Histories of Toronto Moving Image Culture (Images Festival, LIFT and YYZ Books, 2013). Sirove has completed curatorial projects for such institutions as A Space Gallery and Vtape Distribution Centre, in Toronto, Ontario, and written about media art for such publications as Fuse Magazine and (with Erin Morton) Postscript.

Venue & Address: 
A Space Gallery 401 Richmond Street West, Suite 110 Toronto, ON, M5V 3A8
Website: 
http://www.aspacegallery.org
Phone: 
416-979-9633

Derek Sullivan: The Missing Novella

abstract artwork
Saturday, September 19, 2015 - 1:00pm to Sunday, January 3, 2016 - 10:00pm

The work of Toronto-based artist Derek Sullivan builds on historical legacies of both conceptualism and modernist art and design. For his solo exhibition at Oakville Galleries, Sullivan will stage Gairloch Gardens as a fictional country house akin to those described by authors such as E.M. Forster and Patricia Highsmith. Featuring installations of books, screens and furniture sculptures; wall drawing; and a selection of recent works from his ongoing Poster Drawings series—including new works referencing decorative mirrors—Sullivan reimagines Gairloch estate as the setting of oblique narratives of class conflict, romance, family melodrama, and murder.

Venue & Address: 
Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens

Scotiabank Nuit Blanche - Reasons to celebrate!

Image from Chthuluscene, by PVS
Friday, October 2, 2015 - 4:00am

This Saturday “We’ve Been Expecting You” signs that are on lampposts around Toronto should prove accurate, but with a twist. About a million people will hit the streets to expect the unexpected.

That evening until sunrise will be the 10th annual Scotiabank Nuit Blanche, a dusk-to-dawn art event that has earned a place as one of the centerpieces of Toronto’s cultural calendar.

In a city rich with experiences this year that range from the Pan Am Parapan Games to  the Blue Jays’ playoff drive, Toronto’s art-all-nighter is a special cause to celebrate. It’s a sign of a city playing at the top of its game when its public officials, its businesses and its people, recognize the importance of culture as the driving force for the economy, for tourism and social connectivity.

This year’s Scotiabank Nuit Blanche promises a wide variety of art and locations, for the first time including Toronto’s waterfront. There are curated programs by Agustin Pérez Rubio and Christine Shaw; an entire district by artist JR; and 10 for 10th — Memory Lane, assembled by Che Kothari. In this program OCAD U joins other Nuit Blanche institutional sites, including the TIFF Bell Lightbox, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, University of Toronto, Gladstone Hotel, Drake 150, Gardiner Museum, Bata Shoe Museum and Artscape Wychwood Barns to celebrate the Nuit Blanche 10th anniversary. 

Experience points to several reasons why Nuit Blanche is a hit. It ignites peoples’ imaginations through engaging and challenging art. It is an opportunity for a first exposure to visual art for a younger audience and out-of-town visitors. It’s a social blender, drawing individuals, families and communities from the GTA and far beyond.

Nuit Blanche draws criticism — all answerable. Some say that the event has strayed too far from its original focus on art, filling the streets with enthusiastic, rowdy young crowds that are out for a good time.

Others say that there’s too much corporate involvement and focus on cultural tourism. Or they challenge the quality of the art works; find the art inaccessible.  Most importantly, some question the episodic nature of the event, expressing the concern that resources are focused on a one-time experience that does not train and retain an audience for contemporary art.

As Chair of the Volunteer Nuit Blanche Advisory Committee, I take these concerns seriously. It is true that Nuit Blanche relies on a mix of public and corporate support — it is a model for a successful approach to arts funding.  The payback to Toronto is meaningful.  Its impact since 2006 has grown from $1 million to $40.5 million last year, a lot of money flowing into Toronto’s economy for just one night.

Rowdy? Perhaps. Nuit Blanche is noisy and boisterous but it’s also fun and engages young and old as culturally diverse audiences interact with and comment on art works. Other countries in the world rejoice in cultural events that create a communal spirit around culture. Why not Toronto?  We have embraced Nuit Blanche, an arts-based concept that began in Paris in 2002 and spread to Montreal, Bucharest, Riga, Tokyo, and now Edmonton.

If people scratch their heads about some of the art they encounter, Nuit Blanche is doing its job. Contemporary art plumbs issues and allows its’ viewers to pause and experience the world in different ways. The City of Toronto and the curators work hard to choose work ranging from the spectacular to the intimate and is of the highest quality.

Nuit Blanche draws a wide audience.  This is a good thing, one that institutions can build on.  To respond to concerns about the lasting impacts of the night, Nuit Blanche has established Extended Projects to ensure that some works are accessible to the public for a longer time.  Let’s take the opportunity to review and refresh our public art policies in Toronto and find ways to retain some of the imaginative large-scale pieces that are part of Nuit Blanche on a permanent basis. 

I am proud that OCAD University has been a sponsor and leader in making Scotiabank’s Nuit Blanche a ten-year success.  OCAD U is pleased to be part of Nuit Blanche and keen to champion it and show leadership. Art makes Toronto great and we are living in great times.

- Sara Diamond

A Secret Garden

Friday, November 7, 2014 - 12:00am to Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 9:15pm

A Secret Garden is a multimedia installation that will probe the complex tension between the presumed anti-racist political consensus in Western liberal society, and the racist (sub)texts that persist in children’s films and literature. The work takes as its source Francis Hodgson Burnett’s children’s book The Secret Garden and the films that have been adapted from that text. It explores a two-fold ‘white-washing’ of Burnett’s source text: 1) the sterilizing of explicitly racist and colonialist elements from the text in the various film adaptations, and 2) the impact of the idyllic, colonially derived fantasy space of the novel on young readers.

The installation will function as a conversation between traditional art / craft and the digital vernacular of the Millennial shaped by the children's media of the ‘90s. The gallery space will function as the canvas of the exchange: flowers adorning the walls to emulate ornate 19th century wallpaper; furniture covered with hand-painted flowers, nostalgically evocative of a classical colonial living room meets a ‘90s family / media room.

Upon entering the gallery participants will encounter the clashing signifiers of the nostalgic domestic spaces that inform the original text, its film adaptation, and that of its young millennial viewers. Cliché objects of antiquated wealth will jostle with those of the sprawling post-internet late 20th century: colonial portraiture with gifs; Victorian flowers and statuary with data-moshed video works; hand-painted ‘brown’ Mary Lennox(s),with text-based juxtapositions of the text and film that expose both ideological shifts from the source text, and racist and sexist consistencies.

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U Student Gallery
A Secret Garden

Concert-goers party with Block Heads at WayHome festival

Block Head figure with fish tail
Blue Block Head character
Person taking photo of installation
Man hugging green blockhead
Yellow-haired Block Head
Block Heads installation
Friday, July 31, 2015 - 4:00am

A whimsical, experiential and interactive installation by five OCAD University students and alumni provided hugs, photo-ops and more than a few laughs to the 35,000 concert-goers at the inaugural WayHome Art & Music festival on July 24 to 26.

The installation, called The Block Heads, consisted of nine quirky characters some three metres tall with floppy arms, hair, fur and scales. Faculty of Design students and alumni, Ashley Mauerhofer, Kristin Ryan, Maeve Wallace, Sarah Eldershaw and Zeynep Sen, won first place in a joint Faculty of Design and Faculty of Art competition for their concept, receiving a prize of $5,000 and a budget of $18,000 to build the installation.

Set in the farmlands of Ontario’s Oro-Medonte township, WayHome featured 72 bands and musicians, including Neil Young, St. Vincent, Future Islands and Alt-J, alongside 15 visual artists.

Organizers say the festival will return in 2016 from July 22 to 24.

 

Bent Lines and Folded Space Colette Laliberte and Nicholas Wade

black and white geometric shapes
Saturday, March 7, 2015 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm

Painting upon the surfaces of everyday construction materials as well as directly upon the walls of the gallery itself, these two prominent visual artists and art educators explore the materiality of paint through an abstraction that takes as its starting point the built environment. Interests in light as contained and spilling forth; as material and immaterial within a space inform both artist's work. Investigations into the temporal and spatial characteristics we encounter within an architectural environment manifest in works that are at once complex and minimal. Come to the Latcham Gallery and experience these works that contain multiple perspectives simultaneously yet at the same time remain super flat.

Colette Laliberte is an artist and Associate Professor at the Ontario College of Art and Design University, Toronto (OCADU) where she teaches drawing, painting, installation and site-specific art interventions. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. Exhibitions include Galeria de Arte Universal, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba (2007); Triangle Artists' Workshop 2004, Brooklyn, New York (2004); Durham Art Gallery, Durham, Ontario (2003); Musee des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec (2003); ARCO Madrid, Spain (1996) among others. She is the recipient of visual grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Art Council and, Toronto Arts Council. Her work can be found in private collection in Canada, France and, Spain as well as in the public collection of Le Musee national des beaux-arts du Quebec, le Musee des beaux-arts de Sherbrooke and, the Canada Council for the Arts, Art Bank.

Nicholas Wade has taught at, Queen's University, Kingston, David Thompson University Centre in Nelson, Brock University in St. Catharines, Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia and The Nova Scotia College of Art in Halifax before moving to Lethbridge in 1994 where he taught from 1994 to 2011. In 2005 Wade installed his first permanent public art work entitled "the illumination" in the Millennium Library in the heart of Winnipeg. In that year he also was one of a number of Alberta Artists representing the province at Alberta Scene in Ottawa during Alberta's Centennial Year. In 2014 his work was represented in the Art Gallery of Alberta's 90th anniversary exhibition. Nicholas Wade has exhibited in most major Canadian Cities and has work in the Canada Council Art Bank, Nova Scotia Art Bank and in the collection of The Alberta Foundation for the Arts. He now splits his time
between Lethbridge AB and The Bruce Peninsula on Georgian Bay.

Nicholas Wade will present an Artist Talk on Thursday March 5th at 7pm $5 suggested donation

Please join Colette on Saturday March 7, between 1:00-3:00 pm at The Latchman Gallery, for a last chance to view the wall paintings she produced for the exhibition.

Everyone is welcome.

Venue & Address: 
The Latchman Gallery, 6240 Main Street Stouffville
Email: 
claliberte@faculty.ocadu.ca

A Secret Garden

Image of a decorative floral illustrations surrounding an open space with a gradient of purple
Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 5:00am to Saturday, November 29, 2014 - 5:00am

Opening party: Thursday, November 6 (7-11pm)
In conjunction with GTFO in the Small Space

A Secret Garden probes the complex tension between the presumed anti-racist political consensus in Western liberal society, and the racist (sub)texts that persist in children’s films and literature. The work takes as its source Francis Hodgson Burnett’s children’s book The Secret Garden and the films that have been adapted from that text. It explores a two-fold ‘white-washing’ of Burnett’s source text: 1) the sterilizing of explicitly racist and colonialist elements from the text in the various film adaptations, and 2) the impact of the idyllic, colonially derived fantasy space of the novel on young readers.

The installation will function as a conversation between traditional art / craft and the digital vernacular of the Millennial shaped by the children's media of the ‘90s. The gallery space will function as the canvas of the exchange: flowers adorning the walls to emulate ornate 19th century wallpaper; furniture covered with hand-painted flowers, nostalgically evocative of a classical colonial living room meets a ‘90s family / media room.

Upon entering the gallery participants will encounter the clashing signifiers of the nostalgic domestic spaces that inform the original text, its film adaptation, and that of its young millennial viewers. Cliché objects of antiquated wealth will jostle with those of the sprawling post-internet late 20th century: colonial portraiture with gifs; Victorian flowers and statuary with data-moshed video works; hand-painted ‘brown’ Mary Lennox(s),with text-based juxtapositions of the text and film that expose both ideological shifts from the source text, and racist and sexist consistencies.

Artists Featured: Lido Pimienta, Adrienne Crossman, Benjamin McCarthy and Toni Darling

Curated by Lido Pimienta

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U Student Gallery, 52 McCaul Street
Website: 
http://www.studentgallery.ocad.ca
Email: 
studentgallery@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x 263
Cost: 
Free

Absolutely Free

Matthew Williamson, 2014
Saturday, October 4, 2014 - 11:00pm to Sunday, October 5, 2014 - 11:00am

Scotiabank Nuit Blanche at OCAD University includes works from six international contemporary artists using immersive light, sound, film, video, .gif and sculptural installations. The works are linked through the use of light and moving image, developing unique and interactive environments that will accumulate matter or deteriorate over the duration of the night.

ARTISTS
Grégoire Blunt & Emmy Skensved
Aryen Hoekstra
Lili Huston-Heterich
Lorna Mills
Matthew Williamson
Curated by Stefan Hancherow

"Discorporate" means to leave your body. The term was coined by Frank Zappa in 1968 in the song “Absolutely Free” and is the basis for OCAD University’s 2014 Scotiabank Nuit Blanche exhibition. Currently there exists an epoch where one can discorporate via digital bodies. This phenomenon is apparent when Googling oneself, sharing A Look Back movie on Facebook, or posting a selfie. Viewers are invited to unbind their minds and contemplate the present, where reflections no longer exist in a mirror, but in the glow from technological devices.


Scotiabank Nuit Blanche at OCAD University includes works from six international contemporary artists using immersive light, sound, film, video, .gif and sculptural installations. The works are linked through the use of light and moving image, developing unique and interactive environments that will accumulate matter or deteriorate over the duration of the night.

BIOGRAPHIES
Emmy Skensved and Grégoire Blunt strive to shape the future to look more like DS9. They produce animated CGI, synthesized sounds, meditation fountains, black-lit psychedelia and 3D poetry. They are networked, operating as a post-gender collective in order to enhance performance. S/he absorbs new members, and expands to fill available spaces. The world they document can be understood as one mediated by a synthesis of biological and technological entities; nature amplified. They inhabit a sphere that extends outwards from Berlin toward distant URLs. He favours nudity and high-tempo Nightcore rhythms; she, sportswear and drama. Did I meet you last year at a party or something? Exhibitions in 2014 include: a pool of black milk at Ve.sch (Vienna); a blue piña colada fountain at Altes Finanzamt (Berlin); a frozen tonic-water bar performance at Other Projects (Berlin); a black-lit booze-luge exhibited at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt (Berlin); a series of 2D psychedelic works at d3signbur3au (London), Duve (Berlin) and ESP (Toronto). Emmy is a graduate from OCAD University.



Aryen Hoekstra received his MFA from the University of Guelph and BFA from the University of Alberta. Recent and upcoming exhibition venues include, Mercer Union (Toronto); Art Gallery of Alberta (Edmonton); Forest City Gallery (London, ON); Modern Fuel (Kingston, ON); Blackwood Gallery (Mississauga); Xpace Cultural Centre (Toronto); Olga Korper Gallery (Toronto). His writing on contemporary art has appeared in C Magazine, Border Crossings and Towards Magazine. Since spring 2014, Hoekstra has served as the Director of G Gallery in Toronto.

Lili Huston-Herterich is an artist and curator living in Toronto. She established Butcher Gallery, an independent project space, in 2009 with Brad Tinmouth and the two continue to direct the space. Huston-Herterich held the position as co-director at O’Born Contemporary from 2010 to early 2013. She is a member of the Board of Directors of Mercer Union Centre for Contemporary Art, and was recently recognized on Blouin ArtInfo’s Canada’s Top 30 Under 30 for her independent success with Butcher Gallery. She has previously exhibited at Paul Petro Special Projects (Toronto), Cooper Cole (Toronto), XPACE (Toronto), and at the Sullivan Galleries of The Art Institute of Chicago.

Lorna Mills has actively exhibited her work in both solo and group exhibitions since the early 1990s, both in Canada and Internationally. Her practice has included obsessive Ilfochrome printing, obsessive painting, obsessive Super 8 film & video, and obsessive on-line animated GIFs incorporated into restrained off-line installation work. She has also co-curated monthly group animated GIF projections for the “Sheroes” performance series in Toronto, a group GIF projection event “When Analog Was Periodical” in Berlin co-curated with Anthony Antonellis, and a four-person GIF installation, “:::Zip The Bright:::” at Trinity Square Video in Toronto, with artists Sara Ludy, Nicolas Sassoon and Rick Silva. Mills's most recent project, “The Axis of Something” a solo installation of animated GIFs and large-scale digital prints, was exhibited at Transfer Gallery in Brooklyn, NY. Loran has been a guest artist and speaker at OCAD University.



Matthew Williamson examines the cohesion between the Internet and so-called real life. While working in a broad range of formats from print to video, websites to electronics, his work is focused on the humourous relationships we forge with our machines. He is a graduate of OCAD University and received an MFA from Syracuse University. He has exhibited at Interaccess (Toronto), XPACE (Toronto), and has been featured on Rhizome.org




MATERIAL SPONSORS
Above Ground Art Supplies 
and Spoonflower



Absolutely Free is a Major Cultural and Educational Institution Independent Project funded by OCAD University. The complete program for the evening is available on the Scotiabank Nuit Blanche website.

Image Credit: Matthew Williamson

Venue & Address: 
Enter Through Butterfield Park 100 McCaul St. Toronto, Ontario
Cost: 
Free

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