INVC students offer sneak peek into ROM collaboration

Group photo of students and others involved in the project
Monday, April 9, 2018

A museum technician in white gloves laid out a beaded vest and an ornate hood at the media preview of Uncover/Recover at the Royal Ontario Museum April 6. Imbued with history, culture and artistry, these colourful artifacts are among the objects from the ROM’s archives that nine students from the INVC program are researching for an interactive digital project. The result, Uncover/Recover, will be an online learning environment that incorporates photography, sound, digital manipulation and time-based media.

At the preview, students Megan Feheley and Shawn Johnston spoke about how they developed their works, what inspired them and the travel and research they undertook for this deeply personal project. Feheley will transform and animate images derived from beadwork, while Johnston’s audio work will incorporate the sounds of a deer hoof rattle.

Bonnie Devine, associate professor and the founding chair of the INVC program, believes the project will bring the stories of these artifacts to viewers across the province, and country.  

The Uncover/Recover website will be online this summer thanks to funding support from the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Poster: 
Female student standing next to a table with hood and vest artifacts
a man and three women standing for photo

Flux Refusal - Indigenous Student Association Exhibition

Wednesday, May 2, 2018 - 11:00am to Sunday, May 6, 2018 - 5:00pm

Flux Refusal assembles artistic explorations of Indigenous cultural trajectories, futurities, approaches, and outcomes previously ignored by the Western world. Through the questioning and rejection of norms established by institutions, the epistemology of Indigenous Transmotion is recentred in how we assert our own futures

Location: Indigenous Visual Culture Student Centre, room 410, 113 McCaul. 

Dates and hours: May 2-6th, 11am-5pm 

Opening reception: Thursday May 3rd, 6-8 pm 

Venue & Address: 
Room 410, 113 McCaul Street
Keywords: 

Delaney family meets scholarship recipients

Kiki Delaney shakes hands with a student
Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Former OCAD U Chancellor Kiki Delaney and family members gathered in the bright sky-lit painting and drawing studio at 100 McCaul St. on March 27 to meet the recipients of the Delaney Scholarships.

In 2015, the Delaney Family Foundation made a generous pledge to OCAD University, a gift of $4M to support four specific areas:

The Delaney Entrance Undergraduate Scholarships — renewable, merit-based scholarships for students in Fine Art.

The Delaney Entrance Graduate Scholarships — established to attract the most promising students to the following programs:

  • Master’s in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories
  • Master’s in Criticism & Curatorial Practice
  • Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design

The Delaney Indigenous Visual Culture (INVC) Research Initiatives Fund, which fosters projects and enterprises that support research into Indigenous culture and art.

The Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture. This named Chair allocates funds to critical components of the INVC program, ranging from student outreach and recruitment to the development of teaching resources that incorporate Indigenous perspectives and culture into the curriculum.

The guests heard from two scholarship recipients who spoke about the difference the scholarships made in their academic lives: Jerad Beauregard, in his second year of the undergraduate Drawing & Painting program, and Madeleine McMillan, pursuing her Master’s degree in Contemporary Art, Design and New Media Art Histories

This year, the scholarships support five incoming students and 13 renewals.

Poster: 
Group photo of the Delaney family, president Sara Diamond, faculty and scholarship students
Student Madeleine McMillan speaking at lectern
Two students working on a sculptural piece

Statement from President Diamond on Colten Boushie

Monday, February 12, 2018

On behalf of OCAD University, I offer deep condolences to the Baptiste/Boushie family and the people of Red Pheasant Reserve, and mourn the loss of a young man described by his mother as gentle and optimistic. We agree with Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould when she says “Canada must do better.” It is essential for the judicial system to ensure a fair, just and equitable legal process for all Indigenous people of all ages.  

At this time, our hearts also go out to our Indigenous students, faculty and staff who are deeply affected by Friday’s verdict and its implications.

OCAD University recognizes the urgency for us all, as allies and an institution, to undertake meaningful actions of social justice through art and design education. 

OCAD University acknowledges the ancestral and traditional territories of the Mississaugas of the New Credit, the Haudenosaunee, the Anishinaabe and the Huron-Wendat, who are the original owners and custodians of the land on which we stand.

Pedagogical Perspectives on Indigenous Art and Design

Monday, January 29, 2018 - 1:30pm

INVC and FCDC have collaborated on a Faculty conversation with Nigig Visiting Artist, Barry Ace. 

I have sent and invitation to all faculty as an Outlook Calendar invite, but I wanted to share the attached with you as well.  Feel free to share or promote the event.  If faculty office staff are interested in attending, they are more than welcome.

Pedagogical Perspectives on Indigenous Art and Design

Monday, January 29, 2018 - 1:30pm

INVC and FCDC have collaborated on a Faculty conversation with Nigig Visiting Artist, Barry Ace. 

I have sent and invitation to all faculty as an Outlook Calendar invite, but I wanted to share the attached with you as well.  Feel free to share or promote the event.  If faculty office staff are interested in attending, they are more than welcome.

Nigig Visiting Artist Talk: Barry Ace

Photo of artist Barry Ace in front of his works
Wednesday, January 10, 2018 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist who currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed-media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary. He will be on campus from January 9 to February 6, 2018.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U, provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit the university for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore – in a collaborative environment – issues impacting their work. The visiting artist engages and interacts with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop/demonstration.

Please contact Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher, vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca, if you plan on attending. 

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Program is supported through the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

 

 

Venue & Address: 
INVC Student Centre 113 McCaul St. (Village by the Grange) Level 4, Room 410
Email: 
vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

Documentary screening: WHEN THEY AWAKE

Film poster depicting a number of Indigenous artists
Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 6:45pm to 9:00pm

Following in the footsteps of trailblazers like Buffy Sainte-Marie and Robbie Robertson, Indigenous musicians across North America are carving paths into mainstream consciousness, reclaiming their rightful place in contemporary culture, and using music as a gateway for dialogue and reconciliation. 

With intimate access to all the key players, from Tanya Tagaq to A Tribe Called Red and everyone in between, WHEN THEY AWAKE is a music revolution right before your eyes.

About the Director (in attendance for Q & A): 
PJ MARCELLINO is a Toronto-based producer/director with Longyearbyen Media. He was previously a photo-reporter, journalist, author, and editor, and later a political advisor with international agencies, before reinventing himself as a filmmaker, bringing onto the screen a sense of urgency and empathy developed through working on hard-hitting socio-political issues such as migration, human security, and peace-building. He studied Documentary Filmmaking at Toronto's Documentary Film Institute at Seneca College.

In partnership with Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U, CULTURE SHIFTS is a documentary series at OCAD that presents documentary media as a catalyst for critical discussions and community action for social change. The series his supported by Art and Social Change, the Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture, the Faculty of Art and the Integrated Media Program.

For information contact Ryan Rice rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University 100 McCaul St., Toronto Level 2, Room 230
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/280362762488775
Email: 
rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

The Mural of the Story – Mini-Symposium

Three panels of murals
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 6:30pm to 8:30pm

Indigenous creative expression is gaining momentum by occupying space as murals on Toronto’s concrete walls. The city as “project space” extends beyond graffiti, postering, flag-raising and site-specific public artwork to address an Indigenous presence located across the GTA. Recent murals speak to land acknowledgement, history and honoring as means to recognize Indigenous tradition, knowledge and beauty.

The Mural of the Story brings together a panel of artists including Tannis Nielson, Philip Cote, Tia Cavanagh and Jason Baerg, who will introduce and discuss their recent mural projects and how they activate community and insert Indigeneity within the urban landscape.

The mini-symposium is supported by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program in conjunction with the winter course Language and the Land.

Panelists Bios:

Jason Baerg is an Indigenous curator, educator, and visual artist who graduated from Concordia University with a Bachelors of Fine Arts and a Masters of Fine Arts from Rutgers University. He currently is teaching as the Assistant Professor in Indigenous Practices in Contemporary Painting and Media Art at OCAD University. For more information about his work, please visit Jasonbaerg.com.

Tia Cavanagh, originally from the northern shores of Lake Huron in Ontario, has also lived and studied in Havelock, Norwood, Peterborough, Montreal and Toronto. Achieving her BFA at OCAD university she now studies at Trent University working on her Masters degree in Indigenous methodologies applied to art making.

Tannis Nielsen is a Métis Woman (of Saulteaux/Anishnawbe and Danish descent,) with twenty years of professional experience in the arts, cultural and community sectors, and ten years teaching practice at the post-secondary level. Tannis holds a Masters in Visual Studies Degree (M.V.S.) from the University of Toronto, an Art and Art History-Specialist Degree from U of T, as well as a Diploma in Art and Art History from Sheridan College, in Oakville, Ontario.

Philip Cote is an artist, an educator, and a Sweat Ceremony leader. A graduate of OCAD University’s Interdisciplinary Master’s in Art, Media and Design in 2015, Philip creates opportunities for teaching methodologies on Indigenous symbolism, language, knowledge, and history. His teaching philosophy comes from his personal experience of Active Participation and experiential learning through his work as Indigenous knowledge and wisdom keeper, and observations through land-based pedagogy.

For information – rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca

Images courtesy of the artists
 

 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University Room 230, 100 McCaul Street
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/165258367576102/
Email: 
rrice@faculty.ocadu.ca
Cost: 
Free

Visual artist Barry Ace joins OCAD University for Nigig residency

Portrait of artist Barry Ace
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U welcomes Barry Ace as the winter 2018 Nigig Visiting Artist-in-Residence. He will be on campus from January 9 to February 6, 2018.

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist who currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed-media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U, provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit the university for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore – in a collaborative environment – issues impacting their work. The visiting artist engages and interacts with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop/demonstration.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency supports the dynamism of Indigenous contemporary art and design practices and is a tremendous educational opportunity for the artist and students.

Faculty interested in scheduling a classroom visit with Barry Ace may email the Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher – vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca after January 3, 2018.

The public is invited to the Artist’s talk at the Welcome Buffalo Stew Luncheon:

Wednesday, January 10, 2018    
INVC Student Centre 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.
113 McCaul St. (Village by the Grange), Level 4, Room 410

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Program is supported through the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

About the Artist:

As a practicing visual artist, Barry Ace’s work has been included in numerous group and solo exhibitions, including: Emergence from the Shadows – First Peoples Photographic Perspectives, Canadian Museum of Civilization (1996: Ottawa); Urban Myths: Aboriginal Artists in the City. Karsh-Masson Gallery (2000: Ottawa); The Dress Show, Leonard and Ellen Bina Art Gallery (2003: Montréal); Super Phat Nish, Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba (2006: Brandon); Playing Tricks, American Indian Community House Gallery (2006: New York); m∂ntu’c – little spirits, little powers”, Nordamerika Native Museum (2010: Zurich); Changing Hands 3 – Art Without Reservations, Museum of Art and Design (2012-2014: New York); Mnemonic Manifestations, Latcham Gallery, (2015: Stouffville); Native Fashion Now: North American Native Style (2016 – 2017: Peabody Essex Museum, Massachusetts and various US venues), Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood, Art Gallery of Toronto (2017: Toronto); Anishinaabeg: Art & Power, Royal Ontario Museum (2017: Toronto); Insurgence / Resurgence, Winnipeg Art Gallery (2017: Winnipeg); raise a flag: Works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015) (2017 Toronto), 2017 Canadian Biennial, National Gallery of Canada (2017: Ottawa).

His work can be found in numerous public and private collections in Canada and abroad, including the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton (Ottawa); Woodland Cultural Centre (Brantford); Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto); Ottawa Art Gallery (Ottawa); The Canada Council Art Bank, (Ottawa); Nordamerika Native Museum (Zurich, Switzerland); City of Ottawa (Ottawa); Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Gatineau); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa); Global Affairs Canada (Ottawa).

He is the recipient of the KM Hunter Visual Artist Award for 2015.

 

 

 

Poster: 
Three beaded cloth and screen installations hanging in a gallery wall

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