Accelerating Duchamp

Serkan Ozkaya, We Will Wait, 2017
Photo illustration by Brett Beyer and Lal Bahcecioglu

Accelerating Duchamp is a re-thinking of the modernist artist Marcel Duchamp’s practice in the culture of contemporary consumer capitalism. Specifically, this research project will focus on his creation of the readymade, works of art chosen but not produced by the artist, in relation to both the rationale of consumer society and what is now called neoliberal politics (privatization, deregulation, free trade).

PROJECT OBJECTIVES:

  • Define a specifically Duchampian form of accelerationism
  • Re-think the role and function of Duchamp’s readymade mode of art-making
  • Propose an alternative aesthetic mode of defining object-oriented relationships that do not depend upon the given structures of consumer capitalism
  • Explore the possibilities of accelerating Duchamp within current artistic and cultural practices

 

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

What would a specifically Duchampian form of accelerationism look like? Generally, I will be examining this question in relation to the larger notion of accelerating culture, which is grounded within current debates around consumer capitalism. I connect his practice to contemporary theories of accelerationism, particularly accelerationist aesthetics, which I argue are vital to contemporary understanding of Duchamp’s readymade mode of art-making. One of my main outcomes of this project is a book-length manuscript titled Apropos of Duchampian Accelerationism, which is being published by Kunsthalle Marcel Duchamp. In addition, I will be organizing a symposium on the topic of accelerating Duchamp, bringing together scholars who are actively pushing Duchampian research beyond the given confines of the current historicized understandings of his practice.

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

A photo illustration: in a dark room, a projection comes from two small holes in a double door and plays on the wall
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Monday, October 16, 2017 - 10:15am
Lab Member: 
Julian jason Haladyn