Measuring & Being: How has the way we measure shaped the way we are?

Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 6:00pm to 7:00pm

Measuring & Being: How has the way we measure shaped the way we are?
Public talk with Peter Hall

 

Thursday, September 20, 2018
6 p.m.

Onsite Gallery, 199 Richmond St. W.

 

Free

 

Drawing from Peter’s current research into a critical history of data visualization and his previous journalistic work on product design, this talk makes connections between international standards of fit, measurement and time and their entanglement with Western industrialization and colonization. He’ll argue that in this history of measurement there are links between an aesthetic movement and racist scientific theories of the 19th and 20th century that will help us better understand the long shadow of Modernism in design education.

Peter Hall is Senior Lecturer in Graphic Communication Design at Central Saint Martins University of the Arts London. His research focuses on mapping and visualization as critical and participatory design processes. His recent essays appear in The Routledge Companion to Criticality in Art, Architecture and Design (Routledge 2018), The Graphic Design Reader (Bloomsbury Academic 2018), Encountering Things: Design and Theories of Things (Bloomsbury Academic 2017) and Design in the Borderlands (Routledge 2014). Dr Hall previously taught at Yale School of Art, University of Texas at Austin and Griffith University Queensland College of Art in Australia where he led the BA Design and Design Futures (2012-15). He is a Visitor to the Information Security Group at Royal Holloway University of London and Co-founder of DesignInquiry, a non-profit educational organization. https://www.arts.ac.uk/colleges/central-saint-martins/people/dr-peter-hall

 

Diagrams of Power showcases art and design works using data, diagrams, maps and visualizations as ways of challenging dominant narratives and supporting the resilience of marginalized communities.

Featuring work by Joshua Akers, The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, Josh Begley, Joseph Beuys, Vincent Brown, Bureau d'études, Department of Unusual Certainties, W. E. B. Du Bois, Estudio Teddy Cruz + Fonna Forman, Forensic Architecture, Iconoclasistas, Julie Mehretu, Lize Mogel, Ogimaa Mikana, Margaret Pearce, Laura Poitras, Philippe Rekacewicz and Visualizing Impact.

Exhibition runs July 11 to September 29, 2018.

 

Support
Diagrams of Power is produced with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, OCAD University's Office of the Faculty of Design, Public Visualization Lab, Nexus Investments, Multi Touch Digital and Microsoft.

Diagram of Power's public workshops and research engagement events is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. W.)
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/668835373488925/
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
Peter Hall talk

CANCELLED - Curator's Tour of Diagrams of Power

Diagrams of Power installation shot
Sunday, September 16, 2018 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm

Regrettably, the Curator's Tour of Diagrams of Power is cancelled. We will post here if we are able to reschedule to a future date. Our apologies for any disappointment.

 

Patricio Dávila, curator of Diagrams of Power, will lead a free, in-depth tour discussing the works and overall exhibition premise. All are welcome.

Diagrams of Power showcases art and design works using data, diagrams, maps and visualizations as ways of challenging dominant narratives and supporting the resilience of marginalized communities.

Featuring work by Joshua Akers, The Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, Josh Begley, Joseph Beuys, Vincent Brown, Bureau d'études, Department of Unusual Certainties, W. E. B. Du Bois, Estudio Teddy Cruz + Fonna Forman, Forensic Architecture, Iconoclasistas, Julie Mehretu, Lize Mogel, Ogimaa Mikana, Margaret Pearce, Laura Poitras, Philippe Rekacewicz and Visualizing Impact.

Exhibition runs July 11 to September 29, 2018.

 

Patricio Dávila is a designer, artist and educator. He is currently Associate Professor in Design at OCAD University, Director of Public Visualization Lab and member of the OCADU Mobile Media Lab and Visual Analytics Lab. His research focusses on developing a theoretical framework for examining data visualization as assemblages of subjectivation and power. In his creative practice he has created mobile applications, locative media projects, essay videos, new media installations, and participatory community projects including: Shadow!, Powers of Kin, Chthuluscene, Tent City Projections, The Line, and In The Air Tonight. His research and practice focuses on the politics and aesthetics of participation in the visualization of spatial issues with a specific focus on urban experiences, mobile technologies and large-scale interactive public installations.

Support
Diagrams of Power is produced with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, OCAD University's Office of the Faculty of Design, Public Visualization Lab, Nexus Investments, Multi Touch Digital and Microsoft.

Diagram of Power's public workshops and research engagement events is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

 

Images: Installation view: Diagrams of Power, Onsite Gallery, OCAD University, Toronto, 2018. Photo: Yuula Benivolski.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. W.)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x265
Cost: 
Free
Diagrams of Power installation shot

Julie Beugin Public Talk

Thursday, March 29, 2018 - 7:00pm

Julie Beugin will be speaking to the OCADU community on March 29, Thursday, at 7pm in room 230.

All are welcome!!

Julie Beugin is a Canadian artist currently living and working in Berlin. Beugin completed her BFA at Emily Carr University (2004) and her MFA at Concordia University (2008).
Made possible by the generous assistance of the Ada Slaight Fund

Venue & Address: 
OCAD U 100 McCaul St., Room 230 Toronto, ON
Cost: 
All are welcome!!
Julie Beugin, Public Talk poster

INTERNATIONAL LECTURE SERIES: RALPH RUGOFF

Photo of Ralph Rugoff
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 7:00pm

The Power Plant and OCAD University present:

INTERNATIONAL LECTURE SERIES: RALPH RUGOFF

Monday, April 16, 2018

7 p.m.

OCAD University

100 McCaul St.

Auditorium (Room 190)

Free admission

In partnership with The Power Plant, OCAD U is pleased to host a talk by renowned curator, writer and gallery director Ralph Rugoff, Artistic Director of the 2019 Venice Art Biennale. Rugoff has been Director of the Hayward Gallery, a seminal contemporary art gallery at London's Southbank Centre, since 2006.  

The Power Plant’s International Lecture Series (ILS) is a long-running program of talks by high-profile artists, curators and cultural commentators from around the world.

This event is part of the ongoing partnership between the Power Plant and OCAD University.

 

 

Venue & Address: 
OCAD University 100 McCaul St. Auditorium (Room 190) Toronto, ON
Cost: 
Free admission
Power Plant Logo

Educator, author, graphic designer Saki Mafundikwa will be guest lecturing at OCAD U

Saki Mafundikwa
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 6:30pm

Saki Mafundikwa has been a graphic designer, author, and educator for over 30 years.  Saki is a globally recognized expert on African writing systems and has given lectures, exhibits and workshops all over the world.  He also started Zimbabwe’s first graphic design and new media college, the Zimbabwe Institute of Vigital Arts (ZIVA) in 1999.  His book on African writing systems, “Afrikan Alphabets”, 2004 is currently being considered for a second edition by Cassava Republic Press, London.

 

Mr. Mafundikwa, has a MFA in Graphic Design from Yale University and upon graduation worked as an Art Director in New York City.  He also taught at Cooper Union, New York, and while he was at Cooper Union, he created the course, “Writing Systems from Non-Western Societies”, which later became, “Experimental Typography”.  He also makes documentaries and his first one, “Shungu” won the Ousmane Sembene Prize at Zanzibar International Film Festival and Best Documentary at Kenya International Film Festival, both in 2010.

 

Nowadays, Mr. Mafundikwa teaches design and film at Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle.

 

Venue & Address: 
Room 230, 100 McCaul
Cost: 
Free

An art of jouissance? Spectacle and consumption in the Parisian Belle Époque

Wednesday, December 13, 2017 - 7:00pm

This talk examines the visual culture of the Parisian Belle Époque through the particularly French notion of pleasure embodied in the term jouissance, which I suggest extends across varied sites and objects of a new consumer society devoted to spectacular entertainments. From the Palais Garnier to Jules Chéret’s advertising lithographs and the Parisian department store as a palace of consumption, this was an age in which sensuality, frivolity, and the joys of looking reigned supreme.

Venue & Address: 
Spadina Theatre 24 Spadina Rd
Website: 
https://www.alliance-francaise.ca/en/culture/lectures/an-art-of-jouissance-spectacle-and-consumption-in-the-parisian-belle-epoque
Email: 
culturel@alliance-francaise.ca
Phone: 
416-922-2014 ext 37
- Anonymous, Opéra Garnier. Picture postcard, 1880s - Grands Magasins de la Samaritaine. Autochrome, c. 1910 - Jules Chéret, pos

True Stories Toronto

The Sunshine Eaters
Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 7:00pm

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
7 p.m.

Free
Cash bar available

Inspired by themes in The Sunshine Eaters, storytellers share true, personal stories of their experiences with comfort through nature. Part of the True Stories Toronto event series. Organized and hosted by Storytelling Coach Marsha (of YesYesMarsha.com).

Storytellers are: Rhiannon Archer, Hisham Kelati, David Keystone, Sage Tyrtle and Jillian Welsh.

 

The Sunshine Eaters is an original multi-sensory exhibition that highlights how artists and designers look to the land and its plants, flowers and trees as a means to imagine and conjure hope in the face of local and global crises.

Featuring work by: Shary Boyle, Nick Cave, Robert Holmes, Jim Holyoak, Brian Jungen, Jessica Karuhanga, Alexandra Kehayoglou, Nina Leo and Moez Surani, Tony Matelli, Alanis Obomsawin, Ebony G. Patterson and Winnie Truong. Curated by Lisa Deanne Smith.

Exhibition runs January 10 to April 15, 2018.

 

About True Stories Toronto – https://truestoriestoronto.com
True Stories Toronto is the city's biggest free storytelling show. For five years, hundreds of Torontonians have enjoyed the format of four storytellers and one storytelling musician, making intimacy in a big room in West Toronto.

“Toronto’s best storytelling show. Still haven’t been to True Stories Toronto? DO IT”
– She Does The City 

About Marsha Shandur  YesYesMarsha.com
Marsha Shandur is the producer and host of True Stories Toronto, and a Storytelling Coach. As the founder of YesYesMarsha.com, she shows professionals and entrepreneurs how to make an INSTANT emotional connection with their dream clients, through storytelling on stage and screen. She has been featured on Forbes, the BBC, Mashable

About Onsite Gallery – www.ocadu.ca/onsite
Onsite Gallery is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. Visit our website for upcoming public events.

 

Support
We acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, which last year invested $153 million to bring the arts to Canadians throughout the country.
Nous remercions le Conseil des arts du Canada de son soutien. L’an dernier, le Conseil a investi 153 millions de dollars pour mettre de l’art dans la vie des Canadiennes et des Canadiens de tout le pays.

The Sunshine Eaters is also produced with the support of Nexus Investments.

Onsite Gallery gratefully acknowledges that the new gallery construction project is funded in part by the Government of Canada's Canada Cultural Spaces Fund at Canadian Heritage, the City of Toronto through a Section 37 agreement and Aspen Ridge Homes; with gallery furniture by Nienkämper.

 

Image: Marsha Shandur onstage at True Stories Told Live, photo by Connie Tsang.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. W., Ground Floor)
Website: 
https://www.facebook.com/events/1728802213808549/
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
True Stories Toronto

Indigenous Art Today: Lindsay Nixon & Ryan Rice

Sunday, December 3, 2017 - 2:00pm

Indigenous Art Today: Lindsay Nixon & Ryan Rice

Sunday, December 3, 2017
2 p.m.

Onsite Gallery
199 Richmond St. W. (Ground Floor)

Free

Lindsay Nixon, Indigenous editor-at-large at Canadian Art Magazine, in conversation with Ryan Rice, Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U and curator of raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015), offer a lively dialogue and their perspectives on critical issues facing Indigenous art today.

 

Lindsay Nixon is a Cree-Métis-Saulteaux curator, editor, award nominated writer and self-loathing art history grad student. They currently hold the position of Indigenous Editor at Large for Canadian Art, and are the editor of mâmawi­-âcimowak, an independent art, art criticism and literature journal. Nixon’s writing has appeared in Malahat Review, Room, GUTS, Mice, esse, The Inuit Art Quarterly and other publications. Their forthcoming creative non-fiction collection, tentatively titled nîtisânak, is to be released in spring 2018 through Metonymy Press. Nixon currently resides in Tio’tia:ke/Mooniyaang, unceded Haudenosaunee and Anishinabe territories (Montreal, QC), where they co-founded the Black Indigenous Harm Reduction Alliance and Critical Sass Press.

Ryan Rice, Kanien’kehá:ka, is an independent curator and the Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD University. His curatorial career spans 20 years in museums and galleries. Rice served as the Chief Curator at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and also held curatorial positions at the Aboriginal Art Centre (Ottawa, ON), named curatorial fellowships with the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria (Victoria, BC) and the Walter Phillips Gallery (Banff, AB), and Aboriginal Curator-In-Residence at the Carleton University Art Gallery. He received a Master of Arts degree in Curatorial Studies from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College, New York; graduated from Concordia University with a Bachelor of Fine Arts and received an Associate of Fine Arts from the Institute of American Indian Arts, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Rice’s writing on contemporary Onkwehonwe art has been published in numerous periodicals and exhibition catalogues, and he has lectured widely. Some of his exhibitions include raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015), ANTHEM: Perspectives on Home and Native Land, FLYING STILL: CARL BEAM 1943-2005, Oh So Iroquois, Scout’s Honour, Hochelaga Revisited, Soul Sister: Reimagining Kateri Tekakwitha, Counting Coup, and Stands With A Fist: Contemporary Native Women Artists. Rice was also a co-founder and former director of the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and currently sits on the Art Gallery of Ontario’s Education Council, Ontario Association of Art Galleries and the Native American Arts Studies Association board.

 

raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000 - 2015)
Curated by Ryan Rice, Delaney Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture, OCAD U

Barry Ace, Sonny Assu, Carl Beam, Christi Belcourt, Rebecca Belmore, Christian Chapman, Dana Claxton, Ruth Cuthand, Wally Dion, David Garneau, Tanya Harnett, Faye HeavyShield, Greg A. Hill, Mark Igloliorte, Jimmy Iqaluq, Elisapee Ishulutaq, Alex Janvier, Piona Keyuakjuk, Myra Kukiiyaut, Rachelle Lafond, Jim Logan, Kayley Mackay, Qavavau Manumie, Ohotaq Mikkigak, Lisa Myers, Nadia Myre, Marianne Nicolson, Lionel Peyachew, Tim Pitsiulak, Annie Pootoogook, Barry Pottle, Pitaloosie Saila and Tania Willard.

raise a flag presents selected works from a national heritage collection representing First Nations, Inuit and Métis art. Housed in Ottawa, managed by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, the Indigenous Art Collection is one of the most important and comprehensive art collections of contemporary Indigenous art in Canada and beyond. In light of and in tandem with Canada’s 150 commemorations, raise a flag represents alternative discourses and uncovers missing narratives from the framework of a national identity. The works in raise a flag focus on recent acquisitions, obtained from 2000 to 2015, which chronicle recent significant national narratives reflecting upon Canadian heritage, diversity and collective memory.

 

Onsite Gallery
Onsite Gallery, located at 199 Richmond St. W., is the flagship professional gallery of OCAD U and an experimental curatorial platform for art, design and new media. On view at the gallery are two inaugural exhibitions in our new expanded space: raise a flag: works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015)and For This Land: Inside Elemental.

Venue & Address: 
Onsite Gallery (199 Richmond St. W., Ground Floor)
Email: 
onsite@ocadu.ca
Phone: 
416-977-6000 x456
Cost: 
Free
Lindsay Nixon Canadian Art Gallery Hop tour

sLab Explorations Talk: Policy Design – Towards Understanding & a Methodological Framework

Policy Design – Towards Understanding and a Methodological Framework Presentation and Open Discussion Nenad (Ned) Rava  Current
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 6:00pm

 

Policy Design – Towards Understanding and a Methodological Framework

Presentation and Open Discussion

Nenad (Ned) Rava  Current SFI Student 

 

Ned has been conducting a study on policy design for more than a year, while building it upon his 15 years of professional engagement with policy and institutional innovation. This will be an opportunity to present the findings (combined with Q&A) - followed by critique and open discussion on the use of design in policy.

 

Interest in policy design has been increasing, but it is still being addressed by designers and policy researchers in isolation from each other. The design community has not produced much research on policy design and any that was done was with an almost complete lack of references to policy studies. Akin to some business research, most of the concepts and methodologies regarding policy design in the design community come from design consultancies, which seek business promotion rather than solid research. The policy community, while producing much more research on this topic, is divided between those who don’t consider policy design a valid notion at all, and those who approach both design and policy in much narrower terms. Moreover, in policy studies we can rarely find references to design research (beyond the so-called “design thinking” hype). Such isolation might be surprising until we realize that policy and design share the same roots in complex social systems approaches and decision-making, amongst others.

 

Why this is important? Firstly, if policy design is to be pursued for systemic social change it needs to be properly conceptualized and operationalized. Secondly, policy design might be a great new opportunity for further development for design research and practice – while also addressing some of the counterproductive tendencies in policy (e.g. techno-economic rationality, "evidence"-based policy, "deliverology"). Thirdly, it is timely to bring back a more comprehensive understanding of design and of policy that has the potential to deal with predicaments of complexity, stakeholder involvement, and working across silos. Nevertheless, the understanding will not suffice without identifying practical ways to deal with the real-life challenges of designing in the policy space.

 

Bio

Nenad (Ned) Rava has spent 20 years in strategic development, out of which 10 years as consultant, advisor, expert, team leader and trainer/coach for governments, UN/UNDP, the World Bank, the EU, and bilateral and philanthropic development organizations. He has provided support to more than 25 governments/public sector systems in areas primarily including institutional innovation, strategic foresight, result-based management, strategic policy design, complex system change, and learning and capacity development. Ned has produced 40+ publications, (including policy papers and change methodologies) and worked on more than 50 projects cutting across diverse policy domains (health, education, social policy, economic development, decentralization). He has studied management, development policy, and comparative politics, and got his PhD on democratization and governance. Ned is currently the Consultant on Integrated Policy Support to the SDGs for the UN DOCO of the United Nations Development Group (DRT Fund: 12 countries, 44 projects, 20 UN agencies).

 

Venue & Address: 
sLab, suite 410, 205 Richmond West
Email: 
gallen@ocadu.ca

sLab Explorations Talk: Participatory Design in an Age of Mistrust

sLab Explorations Talk: Participatory Design in an Age of Mistrust
Wednesday, March 8, 2017 - 6:00pm

Participatory Design in an Age of Mistrust

Patrick Feng  Faculty, OCAD U + University of Calgary

 

Design and foresight often employ participatory approaches that presume interaction with users is a good thing. Certainly, these approaches have done much to broaden more traditional expert-driven research methods. Yet, there are many examples where attempts to involve users becomes problematic and even counter-productive. For instance, inviting public input on how to “best design" an oil pipeline is bound to be contentious, especially when some people are staunchly opposed to any pipeline construction. Thus, even as participatory approaches gain favour with designers, policymakers, and others, there remains the thorny question of whether and how to engage various publics – particularly when some segments of the public are skeptical or downright hostile to the design objective.

This talk will explore when participatory methods work and when they are likely to fail. Drawing on insights from participatory design, science and technology studies, and related fields, I argue the effectiveness of participatory approaches is contingent on groups sharing a set of political and epistemological commitments – commitments that have been destabilized as mistrust of public institutions has grown. As a result, participatory research methods may backfire when used in certain contexts (e.g., controversies with low trust and high stakes). I will explore those contexts and consider how participatory approaches might be adapted in the face of untrusting publics.

Bio

Patrick Feng has been working in the field of science, technology, and society for over 15 years. His research examines the social, legal, and ethical dimensions of emerging technologies, with a focus on policy, governance, and public engagement. A two-time Fulbright award recipient, Patrick has led projects in number of areas including health, energy, and digital technologies. His areas of expertise include science and technology studies, innovation policy, foresight, and science communications. 

Patrick’s current SSHRC-funded project examines how notions of “sustainability” are being defined, measured, and communicated to the public. He is active in initiatives that promote public engagement with science and is especially interested in how citizens can participate and be better represented in decision-making on science and technology-related issues. He currently teaches in the SFI Program and is adjunct professor at the University of Calgary.

Venue & Address: 
sLab, suite 410, 205 Richmond West
Email: 
gallen@ocadu.ca

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