SSHRC Imagining Canada's Future: Dialogic Design Co-Lab

"In the face of intensified urbanization worldwide, what do we see as the highest impact social and human challenges for Southern Ontario, now through 2030?"

Southern Ontario is witnessing increasing urbanization, and with it a host of changes, challenges and opportunities.  For example, younger people are known as early adopters of new technologies, yet older people are experiencing technologies and their consequences in surprising ways. By 2050, we expect a third of Canadians to be older than 65.  What kinds of services, societies, and care do we envision to support our communities in the face of these changes?  

In an unprecedented study, Canada's research council for social science and humanities, SSHRC, has commissioned six regional panels to understand and imagine possible futures for the country in a global context. Strategic Innovation Lab (sLab) at OCADUniversity is leading University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), Ryerson, Windsor and York universities and our combined intellectual communities.

sLab's participatory action research engages a diverse panel of academics, professionals, and students for a Co-laboratory workshop organized and facilitated according to principles of the Structured Dialogic Design methodology.  Dialogic Design is a multi-technique methodology based on human and computer-facilitated structuring of inquiry for a complex social or civic concern. Democratic by design, SDD produces strong consensus while avoiding cognitive biases, by adopting a series of language structures that conserve participant autonomy, authenticity, and shared commitment while mitigating group cognitive bias, power bias, and content complexity. 

The OCAD U-led project centred on an Expert Panel structured as a Dialogic Design (DD) Co-Laboratory to gather primary data, together with an Online Survey, a Public Workshop, and documentation of these activities on the Web. 

Focusing on urbanization as a key regional and global driver of change, the Expert panel was asked:

In the face of increasing urbanization worldwide, what future challenges
do we anticipate for Southern Ontario, now through 2030?

91 challenges were identified by the Expert Panel. On the Top Ten list are those challenges that are most influential on the other challenges, and highly related to the triggering question:

  1. Advancing a diverse and inclusive society
  2. Enabling equitable access to ICT
  3. Governing ourselves responsively
  4. Designing sustainable cities
  5. Overcoming fear of change
  6. Including indigenous rights in planning
  7. Transitioning to a digital economy
  8. Upgrading transportation systems
  9. Stewarding regional ecosystems
  10. Supporting our aging population

A follow up survey, and a public Design with Dialogue session correlated and expanded on the Expert Panel workshop findings.

In naming and assessing the influence of these future challenges, the expert panel considered both increasing urbanization globally and in Southern Ontario. Though urbanization trends will be most apparent in Canada’s large cities, all cities and communities will be affected by the transitions represented by the challenges.

For more information, please visit http://slab.ocadu.ca/project/sshrc-imagining-canadas-future-dd-co-lab.

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

A photograph of Southern Ontario at night taken from the International Space Station
SSHRC Logo
Monday, October 23, 2017 - 10:15am
Lab Member: 
Greg Van alstyne
Peter Jones
Suzanne Stein

QUIPUCAMAYOC

Quipucamayoc is an interactive art and technology project that merges a range of contemporary art forms – including 3D gaming, electroacoustical music, dance, experimental theatre, and wearable design – to construct a prototype communication network. This network is not based in text or language but is instead embodied, performative, and sensorial.

The network joins two Andean communities: one in Cusco, Peru, the former capital of the Incan empire, and another in Buenos Aires, Argentina, which has a large expatriate community of Peruvian Andean migrant workers. The network is activated through wearable technology inspired by quipucamayoc, the data keepers of the Incan court who recorded information about life in the empire using a complex string and knot notation system which they wore around their bodies. Body sensor arrays, which serve simultaneously as game controllers and musical instruments, are worn by movement artists to co-create live interactive generative narratives, imagery and music. The result is a public performance which reconnects two communities through interactive gameplay based in their common histories.

This project was inspired by the Huarochiri Manuscript, a 16th century written compilation of pre-colombian Andean religious rites, which offers a complex and fragmented narrative structure as well as rich visual and sound passages. Quipucamayoc was developed and presented by a collective of over 35 artists, historians, cultural theorists and technical experts in Peru, Argentina and Canada.

The audiovisual materials listed below are the result of a series of workshops held in Cusco and Buenos Aires between 2012 and 2016, and the final performance which was streamed live online in December 2016. The Quipucamayoc documentary can be viewed here.

Quipucamayoc also produced a series of 2D digital prints on canvas, adapted from 3D virtual environments. These prints were exhibited in a group show of the Faculty of Art Summer Institute from September 18 to 22nd, 2017 in the Ada Slaight Galleries at 100 McCaul. 

AUDIO AND VIDEO:
QUIPUCAMAYOC SOUNDCLOUD (audio)
QUIPUCAMAYOC WORKSHOP IN CUSCO (video)
QUIPUCAMAYOC WORKSHOP IN BUENOS AIRES (video)

ARTICLES OF INTEREST:
David McIntosh Receives SSHRC Funding for QUIPUCAMAYOC
Site-Specific Interview with David McIntosh

For more information please visit: http://quipucamayoc.com/

Quipucamayoc es una investigación de arte y tecnología que combina varios formatos artísticos contemporaneous – videojuego 3D, música electroacústica, danza, teatro experimental, diseño textil, sensores vestibles – con el objetivo de construir una red de comunicación que no es textual o linguística, sino corporal, performativa, sensorial. Esta red reune Cusco, Perú, y Buenos Aires, Argentina a través de artístas de movimiento usando trajes como controladores de juego e instrumentos musicales, por lo que los bailarines serán los cocreadores de música, de imágenes 3D y de una narrativa generativa/interactiva en vivo.
La inspiración de este proyecto es el manuscrito del Huarochirí, texto del siglo XVI que recopila ritos y mitología andina prehispánica, reconocido por su narrativa fragmentada, compleja, por sus pasajes riquísimos en imágenes visuales y sonoras. Quipucamayoc fue desarrollado y presentado por el colectivo de más de 35 artístas, teóricos y técnicos peruanos, argentinos y canadienses.
Los materiales audiovisuales presentados han sido producidos durante una serie de talleres en Cusco y Buenos Aires entre 2012 and 2016, y el performance final que fue transmitido en línea en vivo en Diciembre 2016.

 

This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

 

SSHRC Logo

 

Creator: 
This is Research poster crop for Quipucamayoc, featuring project image (face)
Digital illustration of a distorted face
Photograph collage of dancers performing Quipucamayoc
Digital illustration, a screen grab from Quipucamayoc
Split screen photo of dancers performing while their in-game characters move
Digital image from Quipucamayoc - two figures dancing over clouds
Photograph of Quipucamayoc team in Cusco
Digital image from Quipucamayoc - Incan figures dancing
Friday, September 29, 2017 - 2:15pm
Lab Member: 
David Mcintosh
Judith Doyle
Emma Westecott

EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology

EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology
Thursday, September 28, 2017 - 10:00am to Sunday, October 8, 2017 - 6:00pm

Imagine this — a 150,000-square-foot abandoned factory

transformed into an ultramodern world where design, innovation and technology are the solutions to today’s grand challenges.

EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology 
September 28 to October 8, 2017

In partnership with the UnitedNations Development Programme and inspired by its 17 Global Goals for Sustainable Development, EDIT will explore the theme of Prosperity For All through an interdisciplinary presentation of design projects from the fields of architecture, healthcare, education and gastronomy.
Many talented artists, designers, students, faculty and alumni from OCAD University will be showing their work at EDIT. Come say hi at OCAD University's booth and prepare to be inspired!

Mickey Mouse's Home of the Future is here in Toronto

Mickey Mouse's home of the future is a fully functional shipping container home inspired by the most beloved Disney character of all time. The project is the result of an OCAD U-wide competition challenging students to envision a sustainable, eco-friendly version of Mickey's future home.

Students Aira Harutyunyan, Rachel McCormick and Sebastiance Ayala are the winners who were given the opportunity to work with Giant Containers on bringing their ambitious ideas to life. Mickey’s new sustainable home will be on-site at EDIT out front of the factory and available for guests to tour. #MickeyMouseinTO
 

See a list of all the exhibitions here

Venue & Address: 
21 Don Roadway, East Harbour (Formerly Unilever Soap Factory)
Website: 
http://editdx.org/visitor-info/hours-directions
Mickey Mouse's House of the Future

ReBlink - extended to April 18, 2018!

Reblink: AGO Exhibition
Thursday, July 6, 2017 - 12:00pm to Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 12:00pm

Visitors won’t believe their eyes (or they’ll at least do a double-take) this summer as the AGO offers a magical new way to experience art. From Toronto-based digital artist Alex Mayhew comes ReBlink, an innovative augmented reality experience that taps into the power of leading-edge technology to give visitors the chance to see works from the AGO’s Canadian and European Collections in a whole new way. 

Using a custom app for smartphones and tablets, visitors use their device’s camera to unlock Mayhew’s modern twists on historical works of art. Mayhew highlights how much we have — and haven’t — changed over time, inviting visitors to look at paintings such as Evisceration of a Roebuck with a Portrait of a Married Couple, Drawing Lots and Marchesa Casati through his unique 21st century lens. By looking at a selected work using a smartphone or tablet, visitors will see something unexpected – the painting’s subjects coming alive, reflecting a vision of our daily reality in the 21st century.

Venue & Address: 
Art Gallery of Ontario 317 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 1G4
Website: 
http://www.ago.net/reblink

Anda Kubis

Digital technologies have fundamentally changed every aspect of how we work today. As a contemporary artist and educator it is incumbent upon me to challenge my artistic practice by employing the newest tools available. This is an experimental process yet not an original nor isolated one. I am collaborating with a global artistic community that is pushing forward and adapting to the changes that these new technologies present. I approach all of my work as an abstract painter.