“There are people making beautiful art through code” - Where dance and technology meet

 

Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 9:00pm

“There are people making beautiful art through code,” says Luke Garwood, a student entering his second year in OCAD U’s Digital Futures program. He’s also an accomplished dancer.

Luke moved to Toronto from Montreal when he was 16 to study at the National Ballet School.  After graduating, he worked in Europe and spent five years working at the Toronto Dance Theatre.  He’s been freelancing since then doing modern dance, music videos and theatre. 

Luke also competed in last weekend’s Street versus Stage dance battle at the SummerWorks Festival. 

“I’ve always been interested in technology,” says Luke.  “The dance world and its ephemeral quality has its limitations – it only exists while it’s being performed. With digital tech becoming more immersive, this can change.”

Digital Futures is a unique program where students can blend their interests in art, computer programming, design and business.  The program is already feeding his dancing, says Luke.  He’s created augmented reality dance app that’s available in iTunes by searching “Ephemeral App”.  

Luke’s three reasons how digital media can help dancers:

  1. Digital is our current environment. Dance can either choose to be a time capsule of what it used to be or run with the current times and push ahead.
  2. Digital media is a great creative tool. For example, 3D mapping with camera can do amazing things with body movement. It can also create immersive experience such as Beck’s recent 3D video concert.
  3. Digital media is a way for the dance art form to last beyond a live performance.  Right now, digital tech is seen as a marketing tool for live dance performances – but, in the future, the digital platform could host or be part of the performance, not just promoting it. 

Image of plant in front of sun in distance
Footprints of the Rouge depicts the important connections experienced during Margaret Cornell Kirk's time as Photographer-in-Residence at Rouge National Urban Park.
Art by Stephanie Comilang, winner of the Sobey Art Award (Leroy Schulz)
OCAD U congratulates artist and OCAD U alum Stephanie Comilang on winning the prestigious 2019 Sobey Art Award. The announcement was recently made by the Sobey Art Foundation and the National Gallery of Canada at a ceremony at the Art Gallery of Alberta in Edmonton.The 39-year-old artist, representing the Ontario region, has been awarded Canada's most prestigious contemporary art prize worth $100,000 CAD.
l-r: Luis Jacob, Councillor Crawford, Dr. Diamond, Mayor Tory, Dr. Nagam.
Today, City of Toronto Mayor John Tory proclaimed 2021 as the Year of Public Art, a year-long celebration of art and community. The announcement was made at OCAD University, Canada's largest and most comprehensive Canadian university of art, design and media. Working in partnership with artists, arts organizations and communities city-wide, the City will engage residents and visitors in a city-wide recognition of public art. 
Glenn McArthur, assistant professor, OCAD University, has been awarded first place in the poster competition at The International Colour Association (AIC) conference held in Buenos Aires in October. The poster highlighted the work of OCAD U first-year Colour and Two-Dimensional design students Alacia Karishma Jiwanand (Lisa), Brendan Callan and Carrie Ma.
OCAD U Instructor Anson Liaw's two illustrations have been selected to be a part of this year's OCAD University “ArtWorks 2019” art exhibition. The two illustrations selected for exhibition are: 1) Title: "Solidarity for New Zealand" .  The first submitted illustration entry is a personal non-commissioned illustration created in response to the two consecutive Christchurch mosque terrorist shooting attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand, during Friday Prayer on 15 March 2019. 2) Title: "Pray for Amazonia" .     
The Canada School of Public Service has announced its new Digital Fellows -- among them, Dr. Jutta Treviranus, Professor, Faculty of Design, OCAD University and Director and Founder of the Inclusive Design Research Centre.
Important news updates from the Research Ethics Board
Professor Saskia van Kampen (San Francisco State U) and Associate Professor Cheryl Giraudy (OCAD U) have received almost $25,000 under the Canada SSHRC Partner Engage Grant (PEG) for their Toronto-based research project Design Wo/ManifesT.O. 2020.
Image of two men dancing.
Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 9:00pm

“There are people making beautiful art through code,” says Luke Garwood, a student entering his second year in OCAD U’s Digital Futures program. He’s also an accomplished dancer.

Luke moved to Toronto from Montreal when he was 16 to study at the National Ballet School.  After graduating, he worked in Europe and spent five years working at the Toronto Dance Theatre.  He’s been freelancing since then doing modern dance, music videos and theatre. 

Luke also competed in last weekend’s Street versus Stage dance battle at the SummerWorks Festival. 

“I’ve always been interested in technology,” says Luke.  “The dance world and its ephemeral quality has its limitations – it only exists while it’s being performed. With digital tech becoming more immersive, this can change.”

Digital Futures is a unique program where students can blend their interests in art, computer programming, design and business.  The program is already feeding his dancing, says Luke.  He’s created augmented reality dance app that’s available in iTunes by searching “Ephemeral App”.  

Luke’s three reasons how digital media can help dancers:

  1. Digital is our current environment. Dance can either choose to be a time capsule of what it used to be or run with the current times and push ahead.
  2. Digital media is a great creative tool. For example, 3D mapping with camera can do amazing things with body movement. It can also create immersive experience such as Beck’s recent 3D video concert.
  3. Digital media is a way for the dance art form to last beyond a live performance.  Right now, digital tech is seen as a marketing tool for live dance performances – but, in the future, the digital platform could host or be part of the performance, not just promoting it.