“There are people making beautiful art through code” - Where dance and technology meet

 

Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 9:00pm

“There are people making beautiful art through code,” says Luke Garwood, a student entering his second year in OCAD U’s Digital Futures program. He’s also an accomplished dancer.

Luke moved to Toronto from Montreal when he was 16 to study at the National Ballet School.  After graduating, he worked in Europe and spent five years working at the Toronto Dance Theatre.  He’s been freelancing since then doing modern dance, music videos and theatre. 

Luke also competed in last weekend’s Street versus Stage dance battle at the SummerWorks Festival. 

“I’ve always been interested in technology,” says Luke.  “The dance world and its ephemeral quality has its limitations – it only exists while it’s being performed. With digital tech becoming more immersive, this can change.”

Digital Futures is a unique program where students can blend their interests in art, computer programming, design and business.  The program is already feeding his dancing, says Luke.  He’s created augmented reality dance app that’s available in iTunes by searching “Ephemeral App”.  

Luke’s three reasons how digital media can help dancers:

  1. Digital is our current environment. Dance can either choose to be a time capsule of what it used to be or run with the current times and push ahead.
  2. Digital media is a great creative tool. For example, 3D mapping with camera can do amazing things with body movement. It can also create immersive experience such as Beck’s recent 3D video concert.
  3. Digital media is a way for the dance art form to last beyond a live performance.  Right now, digital tech is seen as a marketing tool for live dance performances – but, in the future, the digital platform could host or be part of the performance, not just promoting it. 

Attitude, by Doug Panton
Creative Quarterly announced the 2018 Top 25 artists: Fine Art
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photo of Ishkhan Ghazarian with camera
Ishkhan Ghazarian, the recipient of a career-launcher job in the Rouge Park, has his show up in the Ada Slaight Gallery and it was just reviewed in the Toronto Star!
Student Danielle Coleman with MPP Glover in painting studio
Dr. Chris Glover, MPP for Spadina-Fort York and Opposition Critic for Colleges and Universities, visited OCAD University’s campus today for his first official tour and meeting.
AGO reimagined
Associate Professor Peter Coppin remembers the discussion with a visually impaired student that helped him understand how much can be misunderstood when a person has to depend on words to understand what someone else can see.
OCAD U Assistant Professor Ranee Lee's course in the Industrial Design Program challenges budding industrial designers to think locally as they team up with the Regent Park Sewing Circle.  
Sessional Instructor Laura Lovell-Anderson's one-year research residency at Autodesk Technology Centre (https://www.autodesk.com/toronto) beginning February 2019 for Robotic Forming of Structural Profiles. 
Opened in September 2017, York Region District School Board honoured the Order of Canada and Governor General Award recipient by naming its new Stouffville school Barbara Reid Public School.
Image of two men dancing.
Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 9:00pm

“There are people making beautiful art through code,” says Luke Garwood, a student entering his second year in OCAD U’s Digital Futures program. He’s also an accomplished dancer.

Luke moved to Toronto from Montreal when he was 16 to study at the National Ballet School.  After graduating, he worked in Europe and spent five years working at the Toronto Dance Theatre.  He’s been freelancing since then doing modern dance, music videos and theatre. 

Luke also competed in last weekend’s Street versus Stage dance battle at the SummerWorks Festival. 

“I’ve always been interested in technology,” says Luke.  “The dance world and its ephemeral quality has its limitations – it only exists while it’s being performed. With digital tech becoming more immersive, this can change.”

Digital Futures is a unique program where students can blend their interests in art, computer programming, design and business.  The program is already feeding his dancing, says Luke.  He’s created augmented reality dance app that’s available in iTunes by searching “Ephemeral App”.  

Luke’s three reasons how digital media can help dancers:

  1. Digital is our current environment. Dance can either choose to be a time capsule of what it used to be or run with the current times and push ahead.
  2. Digital media is a great creative tool. For example, 3D mapping with camera can do amazing things with body movement. It can also create immersive experience such as Beck’s recent 3D video concert.
  3. Digital media is a way for the dance art form to last beyond a live performance.  Right now, digital tech is seen as a marketing tool for live dance performances – but, in the future, the digital platform could host or be part of the performance, not just promoting it.