David Griffin participating in a visual-literacy research project

 

Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 10:00am

Albright-Knox’s Collaborative Project Recommended for NEA Research Grant

Buffalo, NY – The Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s Innovation Lab and its partners have been recommended by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Research: Art Works program for an award of $85,000 for the Art of Visual Comprehension project. The project is a scientific study testing whether visual art training can enhance visual perception and visual cognition skills. The museum’s Innovation Lab has played a key role in bringing together leading experts in visual arts education, visual perception and visual cognition, and vision. The project is a collaboration with Vanderbilt University, the Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD U), and the State University of New York at Buffalo, including the Ross Eye Institute.

This award was one of fifteen, totaling $724,000, announced by NEA Acting Chairman Mary Anne Carter to support research projects that investigate the value and impact of the arts, either as individual components of the US arts ecology or as they interact with each other and with other domains of American life.

Cognitive neuroscientist Isabel Gauthier, one of the co-investigators at Vanderbilt University and head of the institution’s Object Perception Lab, remarked: “Vision science has only recently begun to reveal great variability in people’s ability to recognize objects, and we still have little knowledge of where these differences come from and how they can be improved. Asking whether visual art training is an important influence on these abilities is a critical multidisciplinary effort in that direction. Visual ability is important to many occupations aside from the visual arts, including medical diagnosis, forensics, and most sciences.”

The project will simultaneously enrich museum programming while advancing scientific understanding in the fields of visual perception and visual cognition. The team of interdisciplinary partners seeks to combine an art-historical approach to understanding images with a scientific understanding of high-level vision. An arts training program, developed in consultation with OCAD U, will draw from existing museum programs and workshops, as well as basic principles taught in introductory visual studies and visual arts courses, in a series of lessons featuring artworks from the collection of the Albright-Knox. In collaboration with the museum, Vanderbilt University will test the impact of the training program on visual perception and visual cognition. The team hopes to use the results of these tests to help shape a curriculum for enhancing high-level visual skills for people from all walks of life, establishing an even more vital role for the visual arts and arts organizations.

The constant bombardment by visual information that characterizes contemporary society demands a highly developed critical ability to observe, memorize, and understand the images around us. Past research has found that most current visual training focuses on a single goal, such as learning to identify similar objects in one category. However, many art museums believe that they are uniquely equipped to offer alternative models of training to help people develop the skills needed to navigate, understand, and analyze our increasingly visual world. The potential impact of more diverse and varied visual training programs, like those used by museums, has never been studied. The Art of Visual Comprehension team seeks to test scientifically whether the kind of visual arts training museums are well-equipped to provide can improve visual perception and visual cognition.

The project, and NEA support, are scheduled to take place over the next two years. Since little is known about individual differences in visual perception, the findings from this project will garner attention from practitioners and researchers in a variety of fields. If the findings are positive, the team plans to use this information to develop a curriculum for enhancing high-level visual skills for the general population.

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery is recognized as home to one of the world’s leading collections of contemporary and modern art. With more than 7,000 objects in its collection and a dynamic series of exhibitions and public programs, the Albright-Knox continues to grow and to fulfill its mission to acquire, exhibit, and preserve contemporary and modern art in an enriching, dynamic, and vibrant environment.

MUSEUM HOURS: Tuesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm. M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY takes place on the first Friday of every month from 10 am to 10 pm. Closed Mondays and Independence, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Days. Admission is $12 for adults; $8 for seniors and students; $6 for youth ages 6 to 18; FREE for Albright-Knox Members and children 5 and under. Additional fees may apply for certain special exhibitions. For additional information, please visit www.albrightknox.org.

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s annual operations are supported, in part, by public funds from the County of Erie and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and by the generosity of our Members. M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY is made possible by a generous grant from M&T Bank; media sponsorship is provided by Kiss 98.5. The Art’scool program is presented by BlueCross Blue Shield of Western New York with additional support provided by an anonymous donor, the Robert J. & Martha B. Fierle Foundation, and Lawley. Access AK is made possible through the generous support of the James H. Cummings Foundation, Inc. Endowment; National Fuel; the Vogt Family Foundation; and an anonymous donor. AK Teens is presented by KeyBank. The AK Innovation Lab was founded with leadership support from The John R. Oishei Foundation, The Seymour H. Knox Foundation, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The Public Art Initiative was established and is supported by leadership funding from the County of Erie and the City of Buffalo.

City MOGULS is a unique event that celebrates Toronto's entrepreneurs in an unforgettable fashion show to raise money for Canadian charities. This year we are proud to be supporting Covenant House Toronto.  The event is Thursday, November 7th at The Toronto Event Centre and we are looking for volunteers! This will be an amazing opportunity to meet people from all different industries in Toronto, as well as be a part of an amazing charity event. If any students are interested in this opportunity, please fill out THIS google form no later than Monday October 21st. If you have any questions or concerns, please email Victoria Marshman at victoria@citymoguls.com or visit www.citymoguls.com for more information.   
Text, "On Being Illiberal" in Prefix Magazine
Dr. Suzanne Morrissette's curatorial text, On Being Illiberal: Indigenous Artists Challenge Western Perceptions of Indigenous Political Knowledge has been nominated for the OAAG's Curatorial Writing award.
Onomatopee - Diagrams-of-Power-Cover
Please see below for full details. 
Left: Eryn Loughheed illustration. Right: Owen Marshall stop sign work. Images Courtesy of the Artists.
These eight emerging bookmakers, photographers, publishers, printmakers and ephemera-enthusiasts will showcase and market their editioned prints, books, or other artworks to a growing audience of over 10,000 artists, curators, collectors, and book-lovers.
Artist Luke Parnell working at rooftop studio, Guanajuato, Mexico
Luke Parnell, Assistant Professor at OCAD University’s Faculty of Art, is taking part as a resident artist at the 2019 Festival Internacional Cervantino  ̶  one of the largest arts festivals in the world. As this year's guest country at the festival, Canada will feature its vibrant and diverse arts sector on the stages and streets of Guanajuato, Mexico. As a resident artist, Parnell is working in a rooftop studio, with the backdrop of Guanajuato, October 13 to 19, 2019.
Dr. Caroline Langill, Vice-President, Academic & Provost, OCAD University, joined higher education and Indigenous leaders at the fifth annual Building Reconciliation Forum held last week at Algoma University – the only university in Canada located on the site of a former residential school.   Jointly hosted by Algoma University, Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig, Nipissing University, Cape Breton University and the University of Northern British Columbia, the forum brought together more than 250 participants including university and Indigenous community leaders, Elders, residential school survivors, partners and students from across the country.I n advance of the fifth anniversary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, the forum offered participants a valuable opportunity to exchange ideas and share best practices on how to advance reconciliation through higher education and support the healing journey. 
Konstanz Workshop & Lecture
TITLE: ILLOKONSTANZ VOL 01 VENUE: Kulturzentrum, Konstanz, Germany DATES:  October 14 - 19 OCADU Professors Gary Taxali will be exhibiting work and presenting a lecture/workshop along with illustrators Greg Mably (OCADU Professor), Thilo Rothacker, Ellen Weinstein, Marc Burckhardt, and Thomas Fuchs.  
Anson Liaw - Blame It On Me
OCADU Instructor Anson Liaw has been named 1 of 50 winning artists selected by CIRCLE QUARTERLY ART REVIEW magazine.  His artwork will be featured for publication in print and online for the Fall 2019 issue of CIRCLE QUARTERLY ART REVIEW.  Three of his illustration images were selected as winning images and will be featured along with a short artist statement sharing his perspectives.  The Titles of  three illustration images (see below) are:  Title: Blame It On Me Title: Slim Pickings Title: Born Evil
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 10:00am

Albright-Knox’s Collaborative Project Recommended for NEA Research Grant

Buffalo, NY – The Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s Innovation Lab and its partners have been recommended by the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Research: Art Works program for an award of $85,000 for the Art of Visual Comprehension project. The project is a scientific study testing whether visual art training can enhance visual perception and visual cognition skills. The museum’s Innovation Lab has played a key role in bringing together leading experts in visual arts education, visual perception and visual cognition, and vision. The project is a collaboration with Vanderbilt University, the Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD U), and the State University of New York at Buffalo, including the Ross Eye Institute.

This award was one of fifteen, totaling $724,000, announced by NEA Acting Chairman Mary Anne Carter to support research projects that investigate the value and impact of the arts, either as individual components of the US arts ecology or as they interact with each other and with other domains of American life.

Cognitive neuroscientist Isabel Gauthier, one of the co-investigators at Vanderbilt University and head of the institution’s Object Perception Lab, remarked: “Vision science has only recently begun to reveal great variability in people’s ability to recognize objects, and we still have little knowledge of where these differences come from and how they can be improved. Asking whether visual art training is an important influence on these abilities is a critical multidisciplinary effort in that direction. Visual ability is important to many occupations aside from the visual arts, including medical diagnosis, forensics, and most sciences.”

The project will simultaneously enrich museum programming while advancing scientific understanding in the fields of visual perception and visual cognition. The team of interdisciplinary partners seeks to combine an art-historical approach to understanding images with a scientific understanding of high-level vision. An arts training program, developed in consultation with OCAD U, will draw from existing museum programs and workshops, as well as basic principles taught in introductory visual studies and visual arts courses, in a series of lessons featuring artworks from the collection of the Albright-Knox. In collaboration with the museum, Vanderbilt University will test the impact of the training program on visual perception and visual cognition. The team hopes to use the results of these tests to help shape a curriculum for enhancing high-level visual skills for people from all walks of life, establishing an even more vital role for the visual arts and arts organizations.

The constant bombardment by visual information that characterizes contemporary society demands a highly developed critical ability to observe, memorize, and understand the images around us. Past research has found that most current visual training focuses on a single goal, such as learning to identify similar objects in one category. However, many art museums believe that they are uniquely equipped to offer alternative models of training to help people develop the skills needed to navigate, understand, and analyze our increasingly visual world. The potential impact of more diverse and varied visual training programs, like those used by museums, has never been studied. The Art of Visual Comprehension team seeks to test scientifically whether the kind of visual arts training museums are well-equipped to provide can improve visual perception and visual cognition.

The project, and NEA support, are scheduled to take place over the next two years. Since little is known about individual differences in visual perception, the findings from this project will garner attention from practitioners and researchers in a variety of fields. If the findings are positive, the team plans to use this information to develop a curriculum for enhancing high-level visual skills for the general population.

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery is recognized as home to one of the world’s leading collections of contemporary and modern art. With more than 7,000 objects in its collection and a dynamic series of exhibitions and public programs, the Albright-Knox continues to grow and to fulfill its mission to acquire, exhibit, and preserve contemporary and modern art in an enriching, dynamic, and vibrant environment.

MUSEUM HOURS: Tuesday through Sunday, 10 am to 5 pm. M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY takes place on the first Friday of every month from 10 am to 10 pm. Closed Mondays and Independence, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Days. Admission is $12 for adults; $8 for seniors and students; $6 for youth ages 6 to 18; FREE for Albright-Knox Members and children 5 and under. Additional fees may apply for certain special exhibitions. For additional information, please visit www.albrightknox.org.

The Albright-Knox Art Gallery’s annual operations are supported, in part, by public funds from the County of Erie and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and by the generosity of our Members. M&T FIRST FRIDAYS @ THE GALLERY is made possible by a generous grant from M&T Bank; media sponsorship is provided by Kiss 98.5. The Art’scool program is presented by BlueCross Blue Shield of Western New York with additional support provided by an anonymous donor, the Robert J. & Martha B. Fierle Foundation, and Lawley. Access AK is made possible through the generous support of the James H. Cummings Foundation, Inc. Endowment; National Fuel; the Vogt Family Foundation; and an anonymous donor. AK Teens is presented by KeyBank. The AK Innovation Lab was founded with leadership support from The John R. Oishei Foundation, The Seymour H. Knox Foundation, and the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature. The Public Art Initiative was established and is supported by leadership funding from the County of Erie and the City of Buffalo.