Five things I learned in OCAD University's experiential learning program that I couldn't have in a classroom

 

Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 8:45pm

Christine Lieu graduated from OCAD University in spring 2015, after studying graphic design. She participated in OCAD U’s experiential learning program and worked with MeU (a wearable-tech company) through the Imagination Catalyst. Christine’s experience there helped her land a position as a social media designer for Walmart Live Better through Rogers' M-School program.

Here are Christine’s five things she learned in experiential learning that she couldn’t have in a classroom:

1. How to create connections and evolve my network

Because I was given the opportunity to work within a lot of events and shows, I was constantly exposed to meeting new people. Being able to leave a lasting impression and to be able to follow up with these contacts really grew my network and led to potential freelance clients as well as to what made the best fit for my current position.

2. Getting out of my comfort zone

Being at OCAD U, I felt you were generally in the same classes with the same people from year to year, which is great to create a tight-knit support group, but it didn’t give me the chance to challenge my social comfort zone. Experiential learning really challenged me to put myself out there and to try new things and to meet new people that I wouldn’t have normally had the chance to meet.

3. Learning what I love and what I hate 

The well-rounded role that I had really exposed me to a variety of duties from social media and sales/marketing to production and everything in-between. Through this process, you really figure out what you really enjoy and find new passions, while realizing what you don’t enjoy so much.

4. Gain industry experience 

As much as school and theory can prepare you with the background knowledge to do something, there’s no better way to hit the ground running than to be put right within the industry. 

5. Learn and to be able to find what I enjoy to do 

Being exposed to and given the responsibility to try a wide array of roles really gave me the opportunity to experiment and find a passion for design. I appreciated that Robert from MeU believed in me enough to let me take on these roles, and that's where I found my love for social media design. That’s led me to doing social media for Walmart Live Better through the Rogers' M-School program.

Learn more about OCAD U’s experiential learning program

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Christine Lieu
Thursday, July 30, 2015 - 8:45pm

Christine Lieu graduated from OCAD University in spring 2015, after studying graphic design. She participated in OCAD U’s experiential learning program and worked with MeU (a wearable-tech company) through the Imagination Catalyst. Christine’s experience there helped her land a position as a social media designer for Walmart Live Better through Rogers' M-School program.

Here are Christine’s five things she learned in experiential learning that she couldn’t have in a classroom:

1. How to create connections and evolve my network

Because I was given the opportunity to work within a lot of events and shows, I was constantly exposed to meeting new people. Being able to leave a lasting impression and to be able to follow up with these contacts really grew my network and led to potential freelance clients as well as to what made the best fit for my current position.

2. Getting out of my comfort zone

Being at OCAD U, I felt you were generally in the same classes with the same people from year to year, which is great to create a tight-knit support group, but it didn’t give me the chance to challenge my social comfort zone. Experiential learning really challenged me to put myself out there and to try new things and to meet new people that I wouldn’t have normally had the chance to meet.

3. Learning what I love and what I hate 

The well-rounded role that I had really exposed me to a variety of duties from social media and sales/marketing to production and everything in-between. Through this process, you really figure out what you really enjoy and find new passions, while realizing what you don’t enjoy so much.

4. Gain industry experience 

As much as school and theory can prepare you with the background knowledge to do something, there’s no better way to hit the ground running than to be put right within the industry. 

5. Learn and to be able to find what I enjoy to do 

Being exposed to and given the responsibility to try a wide array of roles really gave me the opportunity to experiment and find a passion for design. I appreciated that Robert from MeU believed in me enough to let me take on these roles, and that's where I found my love for social media design. That’s led me to doing social media for Walmart Live Better through the Rogers' M-School program.

Learn more about OCAD U’s experiential learning program