INVC students offer sneak peek into ROM collaboration

 

Monday, April 9, 2018

A museum technician in white gloves laid out a beaded vest and an ornate hood at the media preview of Uncover/Recover at the Royal Ontario Museum April 6. Imbued with history, culture and artistry, these colourful artifacts are among the objects from the ROM’s archives that nine students from the INVC program are researching for an interactive digital project. The result, Uncover/Recover, will be an online learning environment that incorporates photography, sound, digital manipulation and time-based media.

At the preview, students Megan Feheley and Shawn Johnston spoke about how they developed their works, what inspired them and the travel and research they undertook for this deeply personal project. Feheley will transform and animate images derived from beadwork, while Johnston’s audio work will incorporate the sounds of a deer hoof rattle.

Bonnie Devine, associate professor and the founding chair of the INVC program, believes the project will bring the stories of these artifacts to viewers across the province, and country.  

The Uncover/Recover website will be online this summer thanks to funding support from the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Female student standing next to a table with hood and vest artifacts
Student Megan Feheley with the hood that inspired her work. Photo by Martin Iskander

a man and three women standing for photo
Minister David Zimmer with Knowledge Carrier Diane Montreuil, Sara Diamond and Bonnie Devine. Photo by Martin Iskander

Left: Eryn Loughheed illustration. Right: Owen Marshall stop sign work. Images Courtesy of the Artists.
These eight emerging bookmakers, photographers, publishers, printmakers and ephemera-enthusiasts will showcase and market their editioned prints, books, or other artworks to a growing audience of over 10,000 artists, curators, collectors, and book-lovers.
Artist Luke Parnell working at rooftop studio, Guanajuato, Mexico
Luke Parnell, Assistant Professor at OCAD University’s Faculty of Art, is taking part as a resident artist at the 2019 Festival Internacional Cervantino  ̶  one of the largest arts festivals in the world. As this year's guest country at the festival, Canada will feature its vibrant and diverse arts sector on the stages and streets of Guanajuato, Mexico. As a resident artist, Parnell is working in a rooftop studio, with the backdrop of Guanajuato, October 13 to 19, 2019.
Dr. Caroline Langill, Vice-President, Academic & Provost, OCAD University, joined higher education and Indigenous leaders at the fifth annual Building Reconciliation Forum held last week at Algoma University – the only university in Canada located on the site of a former residential school.   Jointly hosted by Algoma University, Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig, Nipissing University, Cape Breton University and the University of Northern British Columbia, the forum brought together more than 250 participants including university and Indigenous community leaders, Elders, residential school survivors, partners and students from across the country.I n advance of the fifth anniversary of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada, the forum offered participants a valuable opportunity to exchange ideas and share best practices on how to advance reconciliation through higher education and support the healing journey. 
Konstanz Workshop & Lecture
TITLE: ILLOKONSTANZ VOL 01 VENUE: Kulturzentrum, Konstanz, Germany DATES:  October 14 - 19 OCADU Professors Gary Taxali will be exhibiting work and presenting a lecture/workshop along with illustrators Greg Mably (OCADU Professor), Thilo Rothacker, Ellen Weinstein, Marc Burckhardt, and Thomas Fuchs.  
Anson Liaw - Blame It On Me
OCADU Instructor Anson Liaw has been named 1 of 50 winning artists selected by CIRCLE QUARTERLY ART REVIEW magazine.  His artwork will be featured for publication in print and online for the Fall 2019 issue of CIRCLE QUARTERLY ART REVIEW.  Three of his illustration images were selected as winning images and will be featured along with a short artist statement sharing his perspectives.  The Titles of  three illustration images (see below) are:  Title: Blame It On Me Title: Slim Pickings Title: Born Evil
Onomatopee - Diagrams-of-Power-Cover
Edited by Patricio Dávila, and designed by Ali Qadeer and Patricia Pastén  
Visitors at OCAD U's Onsite Gallery during Nuit Blanche
Onsite Gallery, OCAD University’s flagship professional and public gallery drew a record crowd of more than 8,000 visitors during Nuit Blanche 2019. Toronto’s nightlong celebration of art included nearly 90 art projects by more than 300 artists. Onsite Gallery’s latest exhibition, ᐊᕙᑖᓂᑦ ᑕᒪᐃᓐᓂᑦ ᓄᓇᑐᐃᓐᓇᓂᑦ Among All These Tundras, on now until December 7, 2019, is an international group exhibition that features contemporary art by Indigenous artists from around the circumpolar world. 
Ada Slaight Studios celebration at OCAD University. Photo: Martin Iskander.
The OCAD U community celebrated the completion of the Ada Slaight Studios - one of the first phases of the Creative City Campus. The Slaight Family Foundation has contributed to a revitalization effort that will substantially change the student experience of the 4th floor south Drawing and Painting Studios.   
Group photo of students and others involved in the project
Monday, April 9, 2018

A museum technician in white gloves laid out a beaded vest and an ornate hood at the media preview of Uncover/Recover at the Royal Ontario Museum April 6. Imbued with history, culture and artistry, these colourful artifacts are among the objects from the ROM’s archives that nine students from the INVC program are researching for an interactive digital project. The result, Uncover/Recover, will be an online learning environment that incorporates photography, sound, digital manipulation and time-based media.

At the preview, students Megan Feheley and Shawn Johnston spoke about how they developed their works, what inspired them and the travel and research they undertook for this deeply personal project. Feheley will transform and animate images derived from beadwork, while Johnston’s audio work will incorporate the sounds of a deer hoof rattle.

Bonnie Devine, associate professor and the founding chair of the INVC program, believes the project will bring the stories of these artifacts to viewers across the province, and country.  

The Uncover/Recover website will be online this summer thanks to funding support from the Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation.

Poster: 
Female student standing next to a table with hood and vest artifacts
a man and three women standing for photo