OCAD U’s Gerald McMaster co-curates exhibition from New York Times photo archive

 

Thursday, August 24, 2017

This fall, the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC) will explore a century of Canada’s history through photographs from The New York Times Photo Archive. Titled The Faraway Nearby, the exhibition examines how the country has been understood and discussed in relation to its closest geographical, political, and cultural neighbour.

The Faraway Nearby is organized by Denise Birkhofer, RIC Collections Curator & Research Centre Manager, and Gerald McMaster, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture & Curatorial Practice at OCAD University. 

“As I reflect on the many meanings of Canada’s 150th birthday, I am continually reminded that we are living in the age of truth and reconciliation,” says McMaster. “I believe this means that we can, at last, honestly discuss and debate the history, merits, and future of this country, as well as recognize and embrace all the groups who have so often been cast into its social, cultural, and economic shadows.”

To mark Canada 150, the exhibition will kick off with a party, open to the public, on Wednesday, September 13, 6:00 to 8:00 pm. It will remain on view until December 10, 2017. 

The Faraway Nearby showcases more than 200 images from the RIC’s newest collection, a cache of nearly 25,000 press photographs chronicling Canadian news, drawn from The New York Times Photo Archive.

The exhibition highlights images of major political events and conflicts, iconic landscapes across the nation, sports heroes, candid reportage on the lives of diverse communities, and portraits of notable Canadians. A photo book by the same name will be published in conjunction with the exhibition by Black Dog Publishing.

Caption: Photographer unknown, [Trudeaumania, Toronto, Ontario], 1968, gelatin silver print.  The Rudolph P. Bratty Family Collection, Ryerson Image Centre

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Thursday, August 24, 2017

This fall, the Ryerson Image Centre (RIC) will explore a century of Canada’s history through photographs from The New York Times Photo Archive. Titled The Faraway Nearby, the exhibition examines how the country has been understood and discussed in relation to its closest geographical, political, and cultural neighbour.

The Faraway Nearby is organized by Denise Birkhofer, RIC Collections Curator & Research Centre Manager, and Gerald McMaster, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Visual Culture & Curatorial Practice at OCAD University. 

“As I reflect on the many meanings of Canada’s 150th birthday, I am continually reminded that we are living in the age of truth and reconciliation,” says McMaster. “I believe this means that we can, at last, honestly discuss and debate the history, merits, and future of this country, as well as recognize and embrace all the groups who have so often been cast into its social, cultural, and economic shadows.”

To mark Canada 150, the exhibition will kick off with a party, open to the public, on Wednesday, September 13, 6:00 to 8:00 pm. It will remain on view until December 10, 2017. 

The Faraway Nearby showcases more than 200 images from the RIC’s newest collection, a cache of nearly 25,000 press photographs chronicling Canadian news, drawn from The New York Times Photo Archive.

The exhibition highlights images of major political events and conflicts, iconic landscapes across the nation, sports heroes, candid reportage on the lives of diverse communities, and portraits of notable Canadians. A photo book by the same name will be published in conjunction with the exhibition by Black Dog Publishing.

Caption: Photographer unknown, [Trudeaumania, Toronto, Ontario], 1968, gelatin silver print.  The Rudolph P. Bratty Family Collection, Ryerson Image Centre