Primo Runner-up for 2017 James Dyson Award

 

Monday, September 11, 2017

Once again an Imagination Catalyst company makes it to the finals of the James Dyson Award. Primo, the project of Richard Revie and partner Victor Lam, is the Canadian runner-up in the Lifestyle category of the award. Its goal is to help would-be skateboarders learn the skill faster and safer than previously possible.

One third of skate board injuries happen in the first week of use. Primo is a product that replaces the nut at the end of the truck (the part that attaches the wheels to the skateboard deck). Primo applies pressure to the wheel, slowing it down so the rider can focus on their mind/body control and learn tricks faster. As the rider progresses, the tension on the wheel is released, eventually allowing the wheel to be completely free. The shape of Primo stops the rider from landing on the board sideways when learning flip tricks.

By 2020, when skateboarders will compete at the Olympic Games for the first time, it is expected that interest in learning to skateboard will increase dramatically. The Primo team knows they can reduce injuries as the sport grows.

From Primo’s site:

“Through the connection between the body and mind, skateboarding tests our capabilities against our will to push ourselves through constant re-evaluation to achieve our desires. To some, it’s just a toy but to others, it’s a way of expressing ourselves.”

The James Dyson Award is an international design award for emerging design engineers. The Award is open to current and recent students. It is run by the James Dyson Foundation, James Dyson’s charitable trust, as part of its mission to get young people excited about design engineering.

In 2015 another Imagination Catalyst company came in first in the national award:  Drumi, the foot-powered washing machine designed by Yi Jiang (BDes, Industrial Design, 2013).

Earlier this year Revie and Lam took the top prize at the Cassels Brock Pitch Competition at OCAD University, taking home $5000 in start-up funds.

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The legs of a person standing on a skateboard
Monday, September 11, 2017

Once again an Imagination Catalyst company makes it to the finals of the James Dyson Award. Primo, the project of Richard Revie and partner Victor Lam, is the Canadian runner-up in the Lifestyle category of the award. Its goal is to help would-be skateboarders learn the skill faster and safer than previously possible.

One third of skate board injuries happen in the first week of use. Primo is a product that replaces the nut at the end of the truck (the part that attaches the wheels to the skateboard deck). Primo applies pressure to the wheel, slowing it down so the rider can focus on their mind/body control and learn tricks faster. As the rider progresses, the tension on the wheel is released, eventually allowing the wheel to be completely free. The shape of Primo stops the rider from landing on the board sideways when learning flip tricks.

By 2020, when skateboarders will compete at the Olympic Games for the first time, it is expected that interest in learning to skateboard will increase dramatically. The Primo team knows they can reduce injuries as the sport grows.

From Primo’s site:

“Through the connection between the body and mind, skateboarding tests our capabilities against our will to push ourselves through constant re-evaluation to achieve our desires. To some, it’s just a toy but to others, it’s a way of expressing ourselves.”

The James Dyson Award is an international design award for emerging design engineers. The Award is open to current and recent students. It is run by the James Dyson Foundation, James Dyson’s charitable trust, as part of its mission to get young people excited about design engineering.

In 2015 another Imagination Catalyst company came in first in the national award:  Drumi, the foot-powered washing machine designed by Yi Jiang (BDes, Industrial Design, 2013).

Earlier this year Revie and Lam took the top prize at the Cassels Brock Pitch Competition at OCAD University, taking home $5000 in start-up funds.