Unapologetic: Acts of Survivance

 

Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 11:00am

Curator:  Rhéanne Chartrand
McMaster Museum of Art
January 12 – March 25, 2017

A new exhibition at the McMaster Museum of Art presents significant works of art from the 1980s by eleven, foundational contemporary Indigenous artists—Carl Beam, Bob Boyer, Robert Houle, Gerald McMaster, Shelley Niro, Ron Noganosh, Jane Ash Poitras, Edward Poitras, Pierre Sioui, Jeff Thomas and Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun—and acknowledges their critical role in paving the way for Indigenous artists and curators today.

Read the Exhibition Guide online.

During the 80s, these artists declared that the lack of Indigenous representation in major arts institutions across Canada was symptomatic of a broader historical and ongoing indifference to Indigenous peoples.

“They—and many others of their generation—were provocateurs,” says exhibition curator, Rhéanne Chartrand. “They weren’t afraid to talk about the issues and realities of life as a contemporary Indigenous person through their art. Despite the fact that they were acutely aware that the lack of inclusion in major institutions was directly tied to entrenched colonial attitudes that the art world held toward Indigenous art, they never wavered in their resolve to incite change on their own terms. They really broke down barriers and challenged the status quo about Indigenous art, and I believe that this artist-activist spirit has carried forward into Indigenous artistic practice today.”

Through powerful and provocative works, often employing humour, irony and satire, these artists achieved their objective. In place of inaccurate and stereotypical images, they asserted Indigenous peoples’ rights to self-representation, self-determination and sovereignty. Their art stands as both evidence of and a means of cultural survival + resistance = survivance.

Unapologetic: Acts of Survivance, includes eighteen works of art, on view in the Museum’s two main-level galleries. They are drawn from the collections of the artists, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, McMaster Museum of Art, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Remai Modern, Saskatchewan Arts Board Collection, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and Private collectors.

* * * * * * *

EVENTS

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 12, 6 – 8 pm
Curator’s Tour: Tuesday, January 31 at 12:30
Curator’s Talk: Thursday, February 2 at 7 pm
Panel DiscussionFebruary 9, 7 – 9 pm

All events are free and open to the Public.

* * * * * * *

About the Curator

Rhéanne Chartrand (MMSt, Hons. BA) is a Métis curator and creative producer based in Toronto, Ontario. She has spent the past six years creating interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary exhibitions, showcases, and festivals for organizations such as Harbourfront Centre, OCAD University, the Art Gallery of Mississauga, the Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance, the Aboriginal Pavilion at the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games, Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, and the National Museum of the American Indian (Washington, DC). Currently, Chartrand serves as the Curator of Indigenous Art at McMaster Museum of Art located in Hamilton, Ontario.

Unapologetic is the first of two interrelated exhibitions of Indigenous art curated by Rhéanne Chartrand. The second exhibition, Coyote School, will be on display from June 09 to August 26, 2017 and will feature works by emerging and mid-career Indigenous artists who cite influence via artistic inspiration, mentorship or familial connection to the eleven artists presented in Unapologetic. The intent of Coyote School is to acknowledge and respect the contributions that senior Indigenous artists have made to personal and collective Indigenous artistic practices.

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Unapologetic: Acts of Survivance
Thursday, January 12, 2017 - 11:00am

Curator:  Rhéanne Chartrand
McMaster Museum of Art
January 12 – March 25, 2017

A new exhibition at the McMaster Museum of Art presents significant works of art from the 1980s by eleven, foundational contemporary Indigenous artists—Carl Beam, Bob Boyer, Robert Houle, Gerald McMaster, Shelley Niro, Ron Noganosh, Jane Ash Poitras, Edward Poitras, Pierre Sioui, Jeff Thomas and Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun—and acknowledges their critical role in paving the way for Indigenous artists and curators today.

Read the Exhibition Guide online.

During the 80s, these artists declared that the lack of Indigenous representation in major arts institutions across Canada was symptomatic of a broader historical and ongoing indifference to Indigenous peoples.

“They—and many others of their generation—were provocateurs,” says exhibition curator, Rhéanne Chartrand. “They weren’t afraid to talk about the issues and realities of life as a contemporary Indigenous person through their art. Despite the fact that they were acutely aware that the lack of inclusion in major institutions was directly tied to entrenched colonial attitudes that the art world held toward Indigenous art, they never wavered in their resolve to incite change on their own terms. They really broke down barriers and challenged the status quo about Indigenous art, and I believe that this artist-activist spirit has carried forward into Indigenous artistic practice today.”

Through powerful and provocative works, often employing humour, irony and satire, these artists achieved their objective. In place of inaccurate and stereotypical images, they asserted Indigenous peoples’ rights to self-representation, self-determination and sovereignty. Their art stands as both evidence of and a means of cultural survival + resistance = survivance.

Unapologetic: Acts of Survivance, includes eighteen works of art, on view in the Museum’s two main-level galleries. They are drawn from the collections of the artists, Art Gallery of Hamilton, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, McMaster Museum of Art, McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Remai Modern, Saskatchewan Arts Board Collection, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and Private collectors.

* * * * * * *

EVENTS

Opening Reception: Thursday, January 12, 6 – 8 pm
Curator’s Tour: Tuesday, January 31 at 12:30
Curator’s Talk: Thursday, February 2 at 7 pm
Panel DiscussionFebruary 9, 7 – 9 pm

All events are free and open to the Public.

* * * * * * *

About the Curator

Rhéanne Chartrand (MMSt, Hons. BA) is a Métis curator and creative producer based in Toronto, Ontario. She has spent the past six years creating interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary exhibitions, showcases, and festivals for organizations such as Harbourfront Centre, OCAD University, the Art Gallery of Mississauga, the Indigenous Performing Arts Alliance, the Aboriginal Pavilion at the Toronto 2015 Pan Am Games, Kaha:wi Dance Theatre, and the National Museum of the American Indian (Washington, DC). Currently, Chartrand serves as the Curator of Indigenous Art at McMaster Museum of Art located in Hamilton, Ontario.

Unapologetic is the first of two interrelated exhibitions of Indigenous art curated by Rhéanne Chartrand. The second exhibition, Coyote School, will be on display from June 09 to August 26, 2017 and will feature works by emerging and mid-career Indigenous artists who cite influence via artistic inspiration, mentorship or familial connection to the eleven artists presented in Unapologetic. The intent of Coyote School is to acknowledge and respect the contributions that senior Indigenous artists have made to personal and collective Indigenous artistic practices.