Visual artist Barry Ace joins OCAD University for Nigig residency

 

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U welcomes Barry Ace as the winter 2018 Nigig Visiting Artist-in-Residence. He will be on campus from January 9 to February 6, 2018.

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist who currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed-media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U, provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit the university for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore – in a collaborative environment – issues impacting their work. The visiting artist engages and interacts with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop/demonstration.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency supports the dynamism of Indigenous contemporary art and design practices and is a tremendous educational opportunity for the artist and students.

Faculty interested in scheduling a classroom visit with Barry Ace may email the Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher – vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca after January 3, 2018.

The public is invited to the Artist’s talk at the Welcome Buffalo Stew Luncheon:

Wednesday, January 10, 2018    
INVC Student Centre 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.
113 McCaul St. (Village by the Grange), Level 4, Room 410

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Program is supported through the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

About the Artist:

As a practicing visual artist, Barry Ace’s work has been included in numerous group and solo exhibitions, including: Emergence from the Shadows – First Peoples Photographic Perspectives, Canadian Museum of Civilization (1996: Ottawa); Urban Myths: Aboriginal Artists in the City. Karsh-Masson Gallery (2000: Ottawa); The Dress Show, Leonard and Ellen Bina Art Gallery (2003: Montréal); Super Phat Nish, Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba (2006: Brandon); Playing Tricks, American Indian Community House Gallery (2006: New York); m∂ntu’c – little spirits, little powers”, Nordamerika Native Museum (2010: Zurich); Changing Hands 3 – Art Without Reservations, Museum of Art and Design (2012-2014: New York); Mnemonic Manifestations, Latcham Gallery, (2015: Stouffville); Native Fashion Now: North American Native Style (2016 – 2017: Peabody Essex Museum, Massachusetts and various US venues), Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood, Art Gallery of Toronto (2017: Toronto); Anishinaabeg: Art & Power, Royal Ontario Museum (2017: Toronto); Insurgence / Resurgence, Winnipeg Art Gallery (2017: Winnipeg); raise a flag: Works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015) (2017 Toronto), 2017 Canadian Biennial, National Gallery of Canada (2017: Ottawa).

His work can be found in numerous public and private collections in Canada and abroad, including the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton (Ottawa); Woodland Cultural Centre (Brantford); Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto); Ottawa Art Gallery (Ottawa); The Canada Council Art Bank, (Ottawa); Nordamerika Native Museum (Zurich, Switzerland); City of Ottawa (Ottawa); Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Gatineau); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa); Global Affairs Canada (Ottawa).

He is the recipient of the KM Hunter Visual Artist Award for 2015.

 

 

 

Three beaded cloth and screen installations hanging in a gallery wall
Barry Ace, The Trinity Suite

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Portrait of artist Barry Ace
Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Indigenous Visual Culture at OCAD U welcomes Barry Ace as the winter 2018 Nigig Visiting Artist-in-Residence. He will be on campus from January 9 to February 6, 2018.

Barry Ace is a practicing visual artist who currently lives in Ottawa. He is a band member of M’Chigeeng First Nation, Manitoulin Island, Ontario. His mixed-media paintings and assemblage textile works explore various aspects of cultural continuity and the confluence of the historical and contemporary.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency, hosted by the Indigenous Visual Culture Program at OCAD U, provides an opportunity for an Indigenous artist to visit the university for a three-to-four week period to focus on a short-term project and explore – in a collaborative environment – issues impacting their work. The visiting artist engages and interacts with students and faculty in the capacity of mentorship, critique, lecture and a public workshop/demonstration.

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency supports the dynamism of Indigenous contemporary art and design practices and is a tremendous educational opportunity for the artist and students.

Faculty interested in scheduling a classroom visit with Barry Ace may email the Nigig Visiting Artist Residency coordinator Vanessa Dion Fletcher – vdionfletcher@ocadu.ca after January 3, 2018.

The public is invited to the Artist’s talk at the Welcome Buffalo Stew Luncheon:

Wednesday, January 10, 2018    
INVC Student Centre 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.
113 McCaul St. (Village by the Grange), Level 4, Room 410

The Nigig Visiting Artist Residency Program is supported through the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development Targeted Initiative Fund.

About the Artist:

As a practicing visual artist, Barry Ace’s work has been included in numerous group and solo exhibitions, including: Emergence from the Shadows – First Peoples Photographic Perspectives, Canadian Museum of Civilization (1996: Ottawa); Urban Myths: Aboriginal Artists in the City. Karsh-Masson Gallery (2000: Ottawa); The Dress Show, Leonard and Ellen Bina Art Gallery (2003: Montréal); Super Phat Nish, Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba (2006: Brandon); Playing Tricks, American Indian Community House Gallery (2006: New York); m∂ntu’c – little spirits, little powers”, Nordamerika Native Museum (2010: Zurich); Changing Hands 3 – Art Without Reservations, Museum of Art and Design (2012-2014: New York); Mnemonic Manifestations, Latcham Gallery, (2015: Stouffville); Native Fashion Now: North American Native Style (2016 – 2017: Peabody Essex Museum, Massachusetts and various US venues), Every. Now. Then: Reframing Nationhood, Art Gallery of Toronto (2017: Toronto); Anishinaabeg: Art & Power, Royal Ontario Museum (2017: Toronto); Insurgence / Resurgence, Winnipeg Art Gallery (2017: Winnipeg); raise a flag: Works from the Indigenous Art Collection (2000-2015) (2017 Toronto), 2017 Canadian Biennial, National Gallery of Canada (2017: Ottawa).

His work can be found in numerous public and private collections in Canada and abroad, including the Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton (Ottawa); Woodland Cultural Centre (Brantford); Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto); Ottawa Art Gallery (Ottawa); The Canada Council Art Bank, (Ottawa); Nordamerika Native Museum (Zurich, Switzerland); City of Ottawa (Ottawa); Indigenous Affairs and Northern Development Canada (Gatineau); National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa); Global Affairs Canada (Ottawa).

He is the recipient of the KM Hunter Visual Artist Award for 2015.

 

 

 

Poster: 
Three beaded cloth and screen installations hanging in a gallery wall