We’re all misfit consumers — we need inclusive design

 

Friday, August 26, 2016

We’re all misfit consumers — we need inclusive design” — In her article, Jutta Treviranus, director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre at OCAD University, discusses a course titled Unlearning And Questioning, part of the two-year master’s study in Inclusive Design, intended to question assumptions, unlearn conformity and remove boundaries to thought. The students from very diverse backgrounds are challenged with unlearning the fear of “drawing outside the lines” — the compunction to label, sort, rank, filter and conform. They relearn the priceless value of mistake-making and failure. The ultimate learning outcome is a “radical form of inclusive design” that is seen as the next generation of design thinking. The inclusive-design students imagine scenarios of successful innovation agendas, stretching into several successive generations. They consider the potential impact on the complex adaptive system that is our global society. The class soon discovers that if we are rethinking innovation, we also need to rethink common assumptions about entangled factors such as markets, customers, employment, design, research and development. Invariably, our inclusive design students propose that the innovation race we should embark upon is not a race against other countries, but a race against escalating economic disparity and environmental deterioration. They conclude that collaboration and inclusion are good economic strategies – and challenges that Canada is uniquely prepared to accept.

Recipient of 2019 Nuit Blanche Independent Project Career Launcher Announced
Nuit Blanche Toronto and the Centre for Emerging Artists & Designers are excited to announce Crutch CAC as the recipient of the 2019 Independent Project Career Launcher.
Winning designs in 'I Voted' sticker competition
In the lead up to the upcoming 2019 federal election, OCAD University and Instagram have teamed up to encourage Canadians to participate in the election. This past spring, OCAD and Instagram launched the “I Voted” sticker competition, which provided design students at OCAD U and NSCAD with an opportunity to design an Instagram Story sticker that will allow Canadians to share their voting experience with the rest of the Instagram community. The sticker will also link to timely Election Day information on when and where Canadians can vote.  
Partial Gallery x OCAD U Artist Showcase banner
Partial Gallery and OCAD University are excited to announce a new partnership and opportunity for OCAD U Faculty of Art students and alumni. A select number of OCAD U students and graduates are receiving complimentary 1-year Pro Accounts on Partial and inclusion as featured artists within the OCAD University Artist Showcase on Partial’s online platform.
Paranoia by Doug Panton
Illustrator and OCAD U instructor Doug Panton was chosen as a winner n the Fine Art Category
Pick up the October issue of Elle Canada Magazine!
The Textile Museum of Canada is looking for Creatives in Residence! Three emerging professionals – an artist, a curator, and an educator – are invited to explore new forms of engagement with Museum audiences by animating exhibition spaces and activating the permanent collection.
Bordering Flags, courtesy: Fylbert Marion Tan
Five OCAD U students – some current and some recent grads – won Top Talent in the 2019 Adobe Design Achievement Awards. The Awards are the world's premier digital media competition for students and emerging creators, which aims to promote exposure to creative leaders and influencers.
The Inclusive Design Research Centre (IDRC) at OCAD University has received a $2.9 M grant from the Government of Canada, through the Accessible Technology Program for Project We Count. The project will address barriers to participation and employment for persons with disabilities in the rapidly growing data economy. 
Photo credit: Christina Gapic
Friday, August 26, 2016

We’re all misfit consumers — we need inclusive design” — In her article, Jutta Treviranus, director of the Inclusive Design Research Centre at OCAD University, discusses a course titled Unlearning And Questioning, part of the two-year master’s study in Inclusive Design, intended to question assumptions, unlearn conformity and remove boundaries to thought. The students from very diverse backgrounds are challenged with unlearning the fear of “drawing outside the lines” — the compunction to label, sort, rank, filter and conform. They relearn the priceless value of mistake-making and failure. The ultimate learning outcome is a “radical form of inclusive design” that is seen as the next generation of design thinking. The inclusive-design students imagine scenarios of successful innovation agendas, stretching into several successive generations. They consider the potential impact on the complex adaptive system that is our global society. The class soon discovers that if we are rethinking innovation, we also need to rethink common assumptions about entangled factors such as markets, customers, employment, design, research and development. Invariably, our inclusive design students propose that the innovation race we should embark upon is not a race against other countries, but a race against escalating economic disparity and environmental deterioration. They conclude that collaboration and inclusion are good economic strategies – and challenges that Canada is uniquely prepared to accept.