This research project investigates the transformation of affect and surface qualities through the process of translating synthetic data into “real” (physical) objects with material qualities. Of particular interest, is a critical examination of what qualities are gained and which are lost as objects move from digital instantiation, on a computer screen, to physicalization as 3D-printed artifacts. Printers come with a resolution of output that is still crude while on screen one can zoom into the data that is normally lost for the human eye, this is a fascinating area of research still underexplored from the practitioner’s point of view.

Rauch has explored digital surfaces and screens with a haptic sculpting pen. A body of corresponding work was produced, physicalized, using rapidform printers. The intention was to explore the aesthetic qualities of the physical material output. Starting with the more obvious material components of the work, (hard plastics, metal, and ceramic shell powder,) and ending with ephemeral materials (resin and the digital works) she is currently mapping and theorizing shifts in materiality that arise through the process of making the digital manifest.

The larger concern of this investigation is to explore how emerging 3D production technologies are affecting creativity and the development of design-production chains. Traditional sculptors have typically developed a keen tacit knowledge and learned experience about material. With the emergence and proliferation of new digital materials, much of the embodied application of tacit knowledge is now being surrendered to software applications and digital tools. This project seeks to understand: (1) how digital media frame (and are responsive to) such things as, creatives’ level of skill, understanding of material behavior, simulate stress and strength of selected materials, etc.; and (2) how a disconnect in knowledge between the use of digital materials and the materialization through physical material might lead to new usages, novel forms, and emergent aesthetics.

 

Emergent Surfaces Piece 1
Emergent Surfaces Piece 2
Friday, March 9, 2012 - 9:15pm
Lab Member: 
Dr. Barbara Rauch

Overview

Friday March 9th, 2012
Emergent Surfaces Piece 1

This research project investigates the transformation of affect and surface qualities through the process of translating synthetic data into “real” (physical) objects with material qualities. Of particular interest, is a critical examination of what qualities are gained and which are lost as objects move from digital instantiation, on a computer screen, to physicalization as 3D-printed artifacts. Printers come with a resolution of output that is still crude while on screen one can zoom into the data that is normally lost for the human eye, this is a fascinating area of research still underexplored from the practitioner’s point of view.

Rauch has explored digital surfaces and screens with a haptic sculpting pen. A body of corresponding work was produced, physicalized, using rapidform printers. The intention was to explore the aesthetic qualities of the physical material output. Starting with the more obvious material components of the work, (hard plastics, metal, and ceramic shell powder,) and ending with ephemeral materials (resin and the digital works) she is currently mapping and theorizing shifts in materiality that arise through the process of making the digital manifest.

The larger concern of this investigation is to explore how emerging 3D production technologies are affecting creativity and the development of design-production chains. Traditional sculptors have typically developed a keen tacit knowledge and learned experience about material. With the emergence and proliferation of new digital materials, much of the embodied application of tacit knowledge is now being surrendered to software applications and digital tools. This project seeks to understand: (1) how digital media frame (and are responsive to) such things as, creatives’ level of skill, understanding of material behavior, simulate stress and strength of selected materials, etc.; and (2) how a disconnect in knowledge between the use of digital materials and the materialization through physical material might lead to new usages, novel forms, and emergent aesthetics.

 

Emergent Surfaces Piece 2

Documents:



Contributors