Over the past decades, we have witnessed massive global migration resulting from regional conflict, environmental disaster, gender-based violence, poverty and economic collapse, immigration law, and more.  Stories of displacement are often told by experts via timelines or spatial maps of movement from place to place.  Time and space based maps, however tend to erase the human dimensions of migration, and make invisible reasons, impacts and the personal.  The Hyper-Migration project offers a terrain of personal texture, in addition to time and space scales, to convey the multi-dimensional realities of migration. For journeys that encompass forced migration, violence and conflict, the path is never so simple as going from A to B.

These journeys are spurred by a politics of boundaries and location that escape linear definition. Displacement has many causes, trauma exists at a scale that exceeds the political, and memory is a nonlinear tangle of associations. The Hyper-Migration project invites users to input their personal stories of migration, according to date and place, but also as personal topographies of displacement, trauma, and memory to testify to these multidimensional realities, building these accounts for themselves and for visitors.

Migrants are positioned in Hyper-Migration to tell their own stories.  They can choose to map their migration paths in time over space, but also to layer in context-- adding video, audio stories, snapshots, and written narratives to provide detail, context, colour, and rich understandings of both “cause” and experience. These maps counter the faceless, homogenizing maps of human displacement that offer simple geographic or time-based explanation.   As they are built, the maps reveal many things: global patterns of movement; common regional conditions that bring displacement; and varied personal experiences of trauma and recovery, roadblocks and resources, moving and resettling.  Users visiting the site are offered a rich landscape of migration through which to navigate, read, and visually comprehend personal stories of displacement, as well as common global paths of migration in context, space and time.

Keywords: 
Creator: 
Map with arrow from Africa to North America
Monday, April 27, 2015 - 3:00pm
Lab Member: 
Paula Gardner
Dora Poon
Katherine Meyer
Scott Nason

Overview

Monday April 27th, 2015
Map with arrow from Africa to North America

Over the past decades, we have witnessed massive global migration resulting from regional conflict, environmental disaster, gender-based violence, poverty and economic collapse, immigration law, and more.  Stories of displacement are often told by experts via timelines or spatial maps of movement from place to place.  Time and space based maps, however tend to erase the human dimensions of migration, and make invisible reasons, impacts and the personal.  The Hyper-Migration project offers a terrain of personal texture, in addition to time and space scales, to convey the multi-dimensional realities of migration. For journeys that encompass forced migration, violence and conflict, the path is never so simple as going from A to B.

These journeys are spurred by a politics of boundaries and location that escape linear definition. Displacement has many causes, trauma exists at a scale that exceeds the political, and memory is a nonlinear tangle of associations. The Hyper-Migration project invites users to input their personal stories of migration, according to date and place, but also as personal topographies of displacement, trauma, and memory to testify to these multidimensional realities, building these accounts for themselves and for visitors.

Migrants are positioned in Hyper-Migration to tell their own stories.  They can choose to map their migration paths in time over space, but also to layer in context-- adding video, audio stories, snapshots, and written narratives to provide detail, context, colour, and rich understandings of both “cause” and experience. These maps counter the faceless, homogenizing maps of human displacement that offer simple geographic or time-based explanation.   As they are built, the maps reveal many things: global patterns of movement; common regional conditions that bring displacement; and varied personal experiences of trauma and recovery, roadblocks and resources, moving and resettling.  Users visiting the site are offered a rich landscape of migration through which to navigate, read, and visually comprehend personal stories of displacement, as well as common global paths of migration in context, space and time.

Documents:



Contributors