Digital Holography is at the top of 3-D visualization techniques because it is auto-stereoscopic and does not require a computer to view. It also contains many of the visual cues to the brain that we receive when viewing real-world objects and scenes.

Data visualization has often been limited to 2-D imagery even though the original data is obtained three-dimensionally. DECI (Dynamic Electrical Cortical Imaging) uses EEG data sets to create a dimensional visualization constructed from nodes that localize brain activity. In particular, responses to stimuli. Recordings have been made with subjects listening to music, meditating and sleeping.

Our research will attempt to explain the methods, flow and experiments used to formulate a holographic printing process.

Challenges to overcome include:

(1) creating a brain model in a commercially standard 3-D format, 

(2) integrate this model into a standardized hologram printing format, and

(3) creating a blueprint of an experimental software to facilitate this workflow today and in the future. 

 

We set out to data sets recorded by Dr. Doidge and his team could be accurately translated into camera ready artwork for two distinct types of holographic printers. One from the PHASE Research Group and a commercial  service bureau, STM Holographic.

These holograms not only represent the data in 3-D, they also relay time-based data, changes in electrical activity in the brain over time.

GOALS:

In collaboration with Mark Diodge, a scientist in the field of brain imaging at Cerebral Diagnostics Canada Inc., the PHASE research group is developing an interface to bring these compelling images into the medium of digital holography.

Creator: 
Digital Holography - Brian Hologram Banner
Monday, January 26, 2015 - 6:30pm
Lab Member: 
Michael Page

Overview

Monday January 26th, 2015
Digital Holography - Brian Hologram Banner

Digital Holography is at the top of 3-D visualization techniques because it is auto-stereoscopic and does not require a computer to view. It also contains many of the visual cues to the brain that we receive when viewing real-world objects and scenes.

Data visualization has often been limited to 2-D imagery even though the original data is obtained three-dimensionally. DECI (Dynamic Electrical Cortical Imaging) uses EEG data sets to create a dimensional visualization constructed from nodes that localize brain activity. In particular, responses to stimuli. Recordings have been made with subjects listening to music, meditating and sleeping.

Our research will attempt to explain the methods, flow and experiments used to formulate a holographic printing process.

Challenges to overcome include:

(1) creating a brain model in a commercially standard 3-D format, 

(2) integrate this model into a standardized hologram printing format, and

(3) creating a blueprint of an experimental software to facilitate this workflow today and in the future. 

 

We set out to data sets recorded by Dr. Doidge and his team could be accurately translated into camera ready artwork for two distinct types of holographic printers. One from the PHASE Research Group and a commercial  service bureau, STM Holographic.

These holograms not only represent the data in 3-D, they also relay time-based data, changes in electrical activity in the brain over time.

GOALS:

In collaboration with Mark Diodge, a scientist in the field of brain imaging at Cerebral Diagnostics Canada Inc., the PHASE research group is developing an interface to bring these compelling images into the medium of digital holography.

Documents:



Contributors
  • Michael Page
  • Mark Diodge